ETERNAL IMPLICATIONS

EternityFor salvation is nearer to us now than when we became believers; the night is far gone, the day is near. Let us then lay aside the works of darkness and put on the armor of light…live honorably…,not in quarreling and jealousy. Instead, put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to gratify its desires. Romans 13:11-14

 

It was a terrible week. We had just buried my father in Las Vegas, Nevada. I had flown back to Minnesota with my mother, placing her in an assisted living facility in spite of her pleading me to let her come and live with me and my new husband. I would not last a week with my mother, an eighty-nine year-old chronic alcoholic, living under the same roof as us. But I promised my father I would look after her, and I was doing the best I could. I was being laid off from the college where I worked, and I wasn’t sure I would have another job to go to at the end of the school year. With no time off left, I was trying to liquidate my parents’ home and belongings in Las Vegas via phone and email. A nursing assistant who had cared for my father asked to buy two recliners, but requested I hold the check until the first of the month. In the midst of all this chaos, the check fell out of my purse at a drugstore while I was filling my new prescription for anti-anxiety medication.

 

The pharmacist found the check and called the nursing assistant in Las Vegas. She called me and came unglued. She berated me first for losing the check, then for not being with my father when he died, then for “uprooting” my mother and dragging her to Minnesota in the middle of the winter. For what seemed like a very long time, I listened to her abuse and prayed for serenity. God delivered in spades. I took a deep breath and told her to keep the recliners, no payment was necessary. I thanked her for taking care of my parents when I could not. I am not always so gracious, but with God’s help, I made the best of an awful situation.

 

Jesus, Lord of Peace, help us see the eternal implications of our actions. Keep us in perfect peace. Amen

 

Alone on a Colorado mountain, Meg Corrigan faced the unthinkable, a situation that almost ended her life. Hear the details of her astounding rescue from the hands of a gun-wielding attacker and how she walked off that mountain. Hers is a story of tragedy turned holy, a journey of sorrow and healing, a powerful message of hope in the darkest hour. In her memoir, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, Meg credits her resilience to the grace of God. She is also the author of Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist, tales based on her years as a drummer in a Hawaiian show band; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, released this month. Meg is a retired college counselor, author, speaker, trainer and sexual assault survivor. She is a member of the RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network) Speakers’ Bureau. She speaks to churches, civic groups, college students, mental health professionals and law enforcement personnel, as well as youth in juvenile facilities. She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota with her husband, Patrick. She loves to coax seemingly dead plants out of the soil in her yard. The couple have four daughters, ten grandchildren and a great-grandchild on the way. Contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net or www.MegCorrigan.com .

WHERE TO SEND YOUR DEMONS

Demom pigsWhen the demons came out of the man, they went into the pigs, and the herd rushed down the steep bank into the lake and was drowned. Luke 8:33

Last Sunday, our pastor, Andy Evenson, preached on Luke 8:25-39, the story of Jesus casting out demons from a man who walked around naked and lived in the tombs in the area of Gerasenes opposite Galilee. When Jesus asked the man’s name, he said “Legion” because there were so many demons inside him. The demons begged Jesus to send them into a nearby herd of swine. The poor pigs were so traumatized by the demons that they stampeded over a steep embankment, plunged into the lake and were drowned. Before last Sunday, I always thought how mad the pig owners must have been that Jesus just gave up their pigs that way. But Pastor Andy explained that the Jewish people thought pigs were unclean animals, so they probably weren’t bothered by their demise at all.

But here’s the most important point of the story: when the newly demon-free man asked Jesus if he could come with Him, Jesus answered, “Return to your home and declare how much God has done for you” (verse 39). I would like to think I “outran” the old demons in my life—the things I did and said and thought before I got to know Jesus—and I’d rather not think about them. But here Jesus is saying we should remain in the places demons had us on the run—the tombs of our old sinful life—and make sure all the people who “knew us when” we committed all those sins could see clearly what God has done to make our lives so much better. Well. Who knew?

Pastor Andy made another really good point in his sermon: in today’s world, we might wish Jesus would cast demons into something seemingly useless, such as mosquitos. I’d like to watch all of them rush into an abyss, never to be seen again. While we’re at it, let’s send demons into robocalls, slow internet, spam email, single socks in the wash (the “hose zone”), you fill-in-the-blanks. If Jesus could banish a legion of demons into some pigs, think what He could do with our everyday annoyances!

God of Great and Tiny Things, rid us of useless sins and small exasperations. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

CONSPIRACY THEORIES

Conspiracy TheoriesHis divine power has given us everything needed for life and godliness, through the knowledge of Him Who called us by His own glory and goodness. 2 Peter 1:3

 

The Denver International Airport is a hub for the lizard people who run the government and much of the world. The gateway to hell is either under the Denver International Airport or along the French/Swiss border. The earth is hollow and there might be a whole other civilization of advanced beings living there. Osama bin Laden once worked for the CIA. These are a few of the more spectacular “conspiracy theories” I found posted on the internet. “Conspiracy theories” twist facts and are based on the idea that things aren’t as they seem. They are not based on flimsy or contested evidence; they are based on no evidence. A theory about a conspiracy is not the same: the final report on the 9/11 attacks showed much evidence that terrorists planned and carried out the attacks. A conspiracy theory might say, without proof, that the FBI and the CIA actually orchestrated those attacks.

 

In an article on newstatesman.com, conspiracy theories are reported to be “first and foremost forms of political propaganda…designed to denigrate specific individuals or groups or advance a political agenda.” Just because a person or many people believe a conspiracy theory does not mean the theory is true. The article goes on to say these theories are dangerous because they “promote a political agenda…by marketing seductive explanations of major events that are unlikely to be true but are likely to influence public opinion in a preferred direction.” With the advent of the internet, these unproven theories are shared and grown with alarming speed.

 

Those of us who believe that the Bible is God’s Living Word also believe the Good Book is full of truth. That is not to say the books, chapters, and verses cannot be interpreted many ways, and can in fact be used to try to “prove” many false narratives and devious agendas. But for those who seek to follow Christ and know the will of God, the Bible is still the best source we have for learning how to live a sensible and productive life. 2 Peter 1:3 states it clearly: God’s power has given us everything needed for life and godliness.”

 

God of Truth, guide us in all that is right and good. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan is the author of three books: Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child; Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian. She holds a Master’s Degree in Counseling from the University of New Mexico and has over thirty years’ experience working with survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, war veterans, and other trauma survivors.  Her books may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

THE JELLINEK CURVE

JellinekCurve860x655No testing has overtaken you that is not common to everyone. God is faithful, and He will not let you be tested beyond your strength, but…He will also provide the way out so that you may be able to endure it. 1 Corinthians 10:13

 

Alcoholism is a progressive disease. Dr. E.M. Jellinek studied alcoholism, addiction and mental health continuously from the 1930’suntil his death in 1963. Thanks to Jellinek’s acute interest in the personal drinking histories of many subjects, the doctor sought to educate the public about the gradual descent into oblivion that chronic alcoholics experience. His “Jellinek Curve” illustrates these deteriorating alcoholic behaviors, as well as the corresponding healthy behaviors when an alcoholic chooses sobriety. It is no coincidence that the “Curve” shows a beginning, a descent into the bottom of the curve, and a not-so-easy climb back out of the depths of addiction.

 

Chronic addictive behaviors, including alcohol and drug addiction as well as gambling, overeating, spending, sexual deviances, and many other obsessions, are indeed diseases (a condition that prevents the mind and body from working normally), and they are progressive (becoming increasingly worse without intervention to stop the process). But one hallmark of these compulsions is that recovery begins with a conscious choice to change. When I read 1 Corinthians 10:13, I am always struck by my own shortcomings. The passage brings me up short when I realize that I can, with God’s help, resist any and all temptations that befall me. I am not chemically dependent, but I have loved and lived with and lost more alcoholics than I care to remember. And I know it is not so easy for them to accept God’s help to end the cycle of addiction.

 

Does 1 Corinthians 10:13 apply to addictions? Alcoholics Anonymous co-founder Bill W. said men and women who abuse substances “have not only been mentally and physically ill, (they) have been spiritually sick.” Many of the most successful addiction treatment programs include faith and spirituality. Clearly, an addicted person needs a profound change of thinking about herself to achieve sobriety, and one time-honored path to positive self-awareness is faith in God. As with any major life transition, support from friends, family, and society—including our faith communities—can improve the journey away from addiction.

 

Healing Lord, touch those with addictions where they need Your help. Restore them to wholeness. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. To date, she has written nearly 700 different devotions, filling one book of daily readings, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she had hoped would be completed by now. She posts once a week, which means in seven years, she will have enough entries to fill a second book. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing, so Meg is pacing herself, enjoying spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg is involved in volunteer work at her church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and also with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .

LIVING WATER

Living Water“Those who drink of the water that I will give them will never be thirsty. The water that I will give will become in them a spring of water gushing up to eternal life.” John 4:14

 

My husband Patrick can fix and build most anything. He is handy with carpentry, mechanics, electrical, assembly, and just plain trouble-shooting problems around our property. The one thing that seems to defeat him is plumbing. “Electricity is either on or off,” he says. “Engines either work or they don’t. Carpentry takes a good eye and even better measurements.” While I would give up before I even took a serious look at a project, he tackles tasks fearlessly. “But plumbing,” he says, “is a different bearcat. You think you’ve followed all the necessary steps carefully, but you turn on the water and…there’s still a leak!” Water, he believes, has a life of its own.

 

Water is a substance like no other. Water is absolutely essential to life: 55 to 78% of the human body is made of water. The most abundant substance on this planet, water comprises nearly one fourth of the earth’s mass. Ninety-eight percent of that water fills our oceans. And oceans are rising at an alarming rate due to global warming. The city of Venice, Italy, is suffering from an all-time high-water level largely due to melting ice caps thousands of miles away. Some inhabited islands in the Pacific Ocean are in danger of sinking into the sea, and their populations will become “climate refugees.” Even Isle de Jean Charles, a narrow island in the bayous of southeastern Louisiana is slowly sinking into the Gulf of Mexico. Water will have its own way.

 

Jesus spoke to the Samaritan woman at Jacob’s well about the “living water” that He alone can give. This “living water” is the life-essence of Christ that He offers to anyone who believes in Him. The “living water” will find the lowest point in our lives and fill that place with light and healing. Christ’s Spirit will flow into us, lift us from a place of despair and provide us with eternal life, starting right here, right now. Yes, the “living water” of Christ has a life of its own and it is ours for the taking.

 

Lord Jesus, water can be deadly but Your “living water” gives us life abundantly and eternally. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. To date, she has written nearly 700 different devotions, filling one book of daily readings, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she had hoped would be completed by now. She posts once a week, which means in seven years, she will have enough entries to fill a second book. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing, so Meg is pacing herself, enjoying spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg is involved in volunteer work at her church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and also with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .

CAREFULLY TAUGHT

Carefully TaughtThere is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus. Galatians 3:28

 

“How would you distill your thoughts, experiences or observations about race into one sentence (of) six words?” This is the challenge given by former National Public Radio host Michele Norris with The Race Card Project. People are encouraged to condense their observations and experiences about race into one sentence with just Six Words. Since it began in 2010, the Project has received tens of thousands of Six Word stories from throughout the world. One entry was: “You’ve got to be carefully taught,” which has special meaning for me.

 

Those six words are the title of a song from Rogers and Hammerstein’s “South Pacific,” a popular Broadway musical and movie in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s. This production told of cross-cultural love affairs in the South Pacific during World War II. Two threads of my life intertwined to make me acutely aware of the lyrics of the song: one, my forward-thinking high school music director chose “South Pacific” as a school production my senior year, 1964. And two, I was simultaneously being raised by racially prejudiced parents. While my part in the musical was only a small one, the impact the story line had on me was profound.

 

In one of two uncomfortable relationships in the musical, Caucasian actor John Kerr sang the song to his Asian lover, played by France Nuyen. In an attempt to explain to her how their respective races cast a dark shadow on their relationship, Kerr sings, “You’ve got to be carefully taught/to hate and fear/you’ve got to be taught/from year to year/it’s got be drummed in your dear little ear/you’ve got to be carefully taught.” The portrayal of this risky relationship raised eyebrows and hackles at the time. Parents of my classmates—and my own parents—thought the characters were too controversial for impressionable teenagers to portray. The music director persevered and the show went on.

 

Today, there is a resurgence of hatred of “the other” rising in the world. Jesus never intended for us “to be carefully taught” to hate people of other races. Our Lord mandates us to love others as He loves each of us.

 

Jesus, carefully teach us tolerance and unconditional love for all humankind. Amen

DUNNING-KRUGER EFFECT

Dunning Kruger Effect.jpgPraise the Lord! O give thanks to the Lord, for He is good; for His steadfast love endures forever. Psalm 106:1

 

According to verywellmind.com, Dunning-Kruger Effect is “a cognitive bias in which people believe that they are smarter and more capable than they really are.” Because they don’t know what they don’t know, these people often believe they are smarter than they are. We all know someone like this: the uncle who believes he is extremely knowledgeable about computer technology even though his five-year-old daughter can run circles around him on a Smartphone. The entrepreneur who truly believes she has the inside track with the stock market but continually fails at business ventures. The student who blows off test after test but blames the professor for grading the student’s work incorrectly.

 

A common phrase used in the past to describe such folks is: “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.” When psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger coined the phrase in 1991, their simple premise was that “people are unreliable resources for evaluating their own skills and shortcomings” (blog/hubspot.com). Just about everybody exhibits a few Dunning-Kruger traits; we all want to believe we are savvy about subjects that are familiar to us. But it is when individuals separate themselves from the concept of self-improvement and personal discovery—when life revolves only around one’s ability to prove competence at all costs—dysfunction is not far away!

 

Enter the transforming power of Christ! Our living Lord gives us permission to just be ourselves. Christ tells us over and over in Scripture that He loves us unconditionally; even when we repeatedly demonstrate that we are not perfect, He still loves us just the same. The entire text of Psalm 106 is about God’s redeeming, forgiving, transforming love in any and all circumstances. Verse 6 says, “Both we and our ancestors have sinned; we have committed iniquity, have done wickedly.” And verse 8 answers: “Yet He saved (us) for His name’s sake, so that He might make known His mighty power.” Yes, God gives each person the ability to use our gifts and talents in small and large ways, and He rejoices when we live for Him. But He doesn’t base His opinion of us on whether we know all there is to know about anything. He just loves us!

 

Lord, let me be confident in Your constant loving care! Amen

SADNESS

SadnessBe gracious to me, O Lord, for I am in distress; my eye wastes away from grief, my soul and body also. Psalm 31:9

 

I am incredibly sad. As I write this, the Covid-19 cases and deaths are on the rise again, after many states in the US opened up many public venues against the advice of the Centers for Disease Control. As I embraced my sadness, I began to think how much worse the situation is for others in our nation—and in the world—than it is for my husband and me. We are retired, and although we are at higher risk to contract the Coronavirus because of our age and some underlying health conditions, we do not have to leave our home to do much of anything. We can order groceries from home and stay away from public gatherings, plus we have sufficient retirement income so we do not need to work at this point in our lives. We are truly blessed. Others are not so fortunate: they may be forced to work as an “essential employee” and they have many more worries and responsibilities than we do. So…if I’m sad, I cannot imagine the anguish some others are experiencing now. Add to that the current racial unrest following the murders of a number of innocent Black citizens at the hands of police, and we have a powder keg of sorrow, fear and anxiety on top of the pandemic.

 

As I thought about all these people and what they are going through, I was reminded of a favorite Christian song of mine, “Held” written by Christa Wells and first recorded by Natalie Grant. The lyrics relate unspeakable tragedy in the lives of those who have suffered greatly. The chorus reminds us that God is always there and that His promise is to hold us in our darkest hour. The moving words of the song continue: “This is what it means to be held/How it feels, when the sacred is torn from your life/And you survive.” For those of us enduring the triple catastrophe of the pandemic, the economic downturn, and the deep-seated racist issues facing our nation, we can know that our God cares and is holding us up when we don’t believe we have the energy to stand.

 

Great God of Compassion, hold us when we are too weak to go on. Amen

 

To listen to the song, “Held” performed by Natalie Grant, click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJhsexd8Qqg

EZEKIEL AND THE DRY BONES

Valley of the Dry BonesHe brought me out by the spirit of the Lord…in the middle of a valley…full of bones. There were very many lying in the valley, and they were very dry. He said to me, “Mortal, can these bones live?” I answered, “O Lord God, you know.” Ezekiel 37:1-3

 

“Not quite two weeks after the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who died after a now-former Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck, it (was) already clear that what happened to him—and the protests that followed—will be in history books someday,” reported Time Magazine. “The moment is not only a striking turning point in an ongoing Black Lives Matter movement against police brutality, but also set apart by a global pandemic that is disproportionately affecting African Americans.” The questions remained: how long would the protests continue, and would there be real, sustainable, systemic change in the way police interact with the black and brown populations in the United States? I am standing on God’s promise that love will overcome hate and peace will replace outrage.

 

The story of Ezekiel and his vision of the dry bones has some parallels with the George Floyd killing and the world’s reaction. The ruthless Babylonians destroyed the temple in Ezekiel’s hometown of Jerusalem in about 587BC. The Israelites were discouraged and thought God was not powerful enough to protect his chosen people. But God gave Ezekiel a vision of a valley of skeletons and instructed Ezekiel to prophesy hope to the bones. Flesh and sinews appeared on the bones and God breathed physical and spiritual life into them. The vision meant that the Israelites would survive the oppression they were experiencing. More importantly, the people would survive because of God’s power and love for them throughout their dismal circumstances.

 

Ezekiel’s story became popular among black preachers after the Civil War. James Weldon Johnson even wrote a song, “Dem Bones,” which became an anthem for early black social movements. And today, we see the Black Lives Matter movement engaging the entire world in support of humane treatment for people of color. God can put new life in those who have been oppressed far too long. Let us all work towards a world of zero oppression.

 

Lord, speak to the weary bones and hearts and souls of the oppressed. Let them feel Your resurrecting power. Amen

DIVINE INTERVENTION

Divine InterventionJesus answered and said to him, “What I am doing you do not understand now, but you will know after this.” John 13:7

 

I am not one to get sick, but about three years ago that changed. I knew something was wrong. I felt irritable (more than normal), jittery, and hungry, but I was losing weight. I had a ton of energy, but it was pent up and it wasn’t the good kind. It wasn’t terrible, but it just wasn’t me.

 

I finally listened to my body and went to the doctor. After a bunch of tests she indicated that I had Graves Disease, which is very treatable. However, the ultrasound images proved conclusively that I had thyroid cancer, and had several small nodules that needed to be surgically removed.

 

I had the surgery, and it appeared to be successful. The doctor said with rest I would be able to use my voice again in a day or two. After a week I still had no voice. It hurt to whisper, and it was impossible to do my job as a co-owner of a publishing company. My voice is my business: I talk to clients all day long, I speak at conferences, and I lead workshops, but I couldn’t do any of this in my current condition.

 

I went back to the surgeon for my weekly check-up. He was visibly concerned that my voice wasn’t back yet. He started out by saying that this rarely happens, but that he thinks that they may have permanently damaged my vocal cords when they removed the nodules.

 

I was devastated. I racked my brain trying to figure out what I was going to do if I couldn’t use my voice. I tried to find things that relaxed me. Although I went to school for art and design, I had stayed out of that side of our publishing business. But the very next day I started designing on the computer again. I practiced, I took online classes, and worked on my skills. After a couple of weeks I was designing for clients again, and I was happier and more fulfilled than I had been in years.

 

After six weeks, I went to bed one night not being able to utter more than a harsh whisper and woke up with my full voice back. I truly believe that it was divine intervention from God. The doctor was even stunned and called it a miracle.

 

This was not an experience I would ever care to repeat, but I learned a lot about myself during this time. I thought business had to be just business, but by using my God-given talents and adding creativity into the mix I am a much happier person.

 

O Blessed St. Blaise, you received from God the power to protect men from throat diseases and other maladies. Take away the illness that afflicts me, keep my throat healthy and perfect, so that I can talk correctly and be able to proclaim and sing praises to God. Amen

 

Ann Aubitz is the author of Katlyn Conquers the World and The Many Faces of Down Syndrome. Her writing buddy is her daughter with Down syndrome, Katlyn Aubitz. Ann owns FuzionPress/FuzionPrint in Burnsville, Minnesota, with her husband of twenty-six years.