STARS AT NIGHT

star-night-background-19For now we see in a mirror, dimly, but then we will see face to face. 1 Corinthians 13:12

 

One of my most awe-inspiring experiences in life is to view the stars on a clear night from a location away from city lights and noise. My father, born in 1909, became a pilot in the early days of flight. He wrote my mother a letter once when they were courting. “I flew an hour last night” he said.  “Had a lot of fun. It was overcast, and I went up through the clouds. The moon was shining, and it was just as clear and sparkling as anything.”  Knowing how much he loved flying, I can just imagine his thrill and amazement at those glorious stars shining in the dark night sky as he piloted his aircraft to penetrate those clouds. Perhaps I inherited his love of the sky, because it never ceases to bring tears to my eyes to view the constellations in the heavens on a clear night. The world just fades away in the light of those magnificent stars.

 

I imagine this same sense of awe inspired British song writer Helen Lemmel to pen the words of her famous hymn, “Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus.” Lemmel paraphrased a Sunday school gospel tract when she wrote, “Look full in His wonderful face/and the things of earth will grow strangely dim/in the light of His glory and grace.” I can only imagine what it would be like to see Jesus’s face, to gaze into His eyes and see the light and power and tenderness there. All of the lights of earth—nature’s sun, moon and stars, and every man made source of illumination—would pale in comparison to the radiance of His smile, His peaceful countenance, His all-knowing expression. And to know, seeing His face, that He loves me far more than I could hope or imagine, would be to find perfect peace and contentment. All my worries and fears would melt away in the holding power of just one glance from Christ.

 

The Apostle Paul said, in this earthly life we only “see” Christ dimly, as though viewing Him in a mirror (1 Corinthians 13:12). But when we see Him in heaven, we will view Him with new eyes, and the world will melt away.

 

Bright Star of Heaven, shine for us now and throughout eternity! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan is the author of three books: Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child; Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian. She holds a Master’s Degree in Counseling from the University of New Mexico and has over thirty years’ experience working with survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, war veterans, and other trauma survivors.  Her books may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

CARETAKERS

Mature Vietnamese couple at homeReligion that is pure and undefiled before God, the Father, is this: to care for orphans and widows in their distress, and to keep oneself unstained by the world. James 1:27

 

They are among us. They may be us. They may take care of us. Selfless people who assume responsibility for the care and well being of another, related or not. The young wife and mother who never leaves her husband’s side as he loses his battle with brain cancer. The pastor’s wife, a retired nurse, who provides all daily cares for her husband with dementia for years until finally, they find a place in an assisted living facility they can afford. The high school music teacher whose Guatamalan student must leave the country when his father is deported, but the teacher surprises him with a plane ticket back to sing in the spring music concert. The mother who cares for her son after he suffers profound brain and spinal cord injuries in a motor vehicle accident that kills his brother, until she and her husband raise the funding to build a special home for young adults with acute health issues.

 

These are the quiet legions of people who set aside their own lives, ambitions, dreams and hopes and adjust to a “new normal,” doing the unthinkable for others who are unable to do what needs to be done for themselves. They come from all ethic, religious, cultural and economic backgrounds, turning their faces to the howling winds of pain and discomfort that others endure. They make life easier for others, often while sacrificing sleep, paychecks, nutrition, good health, and companionship themselves, to meet the needs of others. They are shining stars in service to humanity, surely worthy of those stars in their heavenly crowns.

 

This is what Jesus meant when He said to the curious scribe, “You are not far from the kingdom of God” (Mark 12:34). Jesus also told the scribe that the second most important commandment, after love of the one true God, is to “love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:30-31). To care for someone else at our own expense is one of the most noble acts anyone can perform. If you see one—if you are one—if you have one, you are blessed.

 

Jesus, bless and sustain all caregivers, paid or unpaid, and help them know they are valued in Your eyes. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

EMPATHS

Father comforts a sad child. Problems in the familyContinue to remember those in prison as if you were together with them in prison, and those who are mistreated as if you yourselves were suffering. Hebrews 13:3

 

The Wake Up by Catherine Ryan Hyde is a novel about a successful cattle rancher who suddenly “wakes up” to the animals on his ranch. This seemingly seasoned rancher discovers he feels the pain of the animals he raises and sells, rendering him no longer able to conduct “business as usual” on his ranch. His relationship with a young mother and her troubled teenaged son provides more opportunities for the rancher to experience his profound empathy towards both animals and people, completely changing his approach to life and the animals and people he cares about.

 

While reading The Wake Up, I had an epiphany of my own. With over thirty years as a professional counselor, I have always been a “soft heart,” caring a great deal for the students and clients I have worked with. And as an adult child of an alcoholic mother, I have often accepted the role of caretaker in personal relationships, even when that may not be my healthiest role. This book made me realize how much emotion I often invest in concern about people I don’t even know and may never meet. When I see the news about natural disasters, I am often moved to tears with compassion over how much the people and animals are suffering. It nearly does me in to see images of victims of mass shootings, racial hatred, child abuse—and the list goes on and on.

 

It is not lost on my that Jesus was—and is—an empath too. He labored in prayer for His disciples and all of His followers, and even included those persecuting Him and ultimately executing Him in His petitions for forgiveness. The disciples and the Apostle Paul emulated Christ’s compassion; Paul’s letters are mostly passionate pleas for peace and wellbeing for those whose paths he had crossed. It comforts me to know that Jesus bears my burdens too, including the weight of my concern for those whose lives are filled with trouble. I’m not sure I could live in this broken, sorrow-filled world without the grace and love of my Savior to see me through.

 

Jesus, You said there would be trouble in this world, but thank You for overcoming the world! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. To date, she has written nearly 700 different devotions, filling one book of daily readings, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she had hoped would be completed by now. She posts once a week, which means in seven years, she will have enough entries to fill a second book. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing, so Meg is pacing herself, enjoying spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg is involved in volunteer work at her church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and also with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .

A PRIZE FOR TELLING THE TRUTH

George Washington and the Cherry TreeJesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me. John 14:6

 

When I was a child, my father worked at the Pentagon in Washington D.C. Every spring we made a pilgrimage to see the beautiful cherry trees, a gift from China to the United States in 1912. My mother told my sister and me the story of George Washington getting caught after chopping down his mother’s cherry tree with his brand new little hachet. Although the story may be only a myth, little George supposedly said to his father, “I can’t tell a lie, Pa; you know I can’t tell a lie.” Washington grew up to become the first president of the United States. He has always been remembered for being a truth-teller.

 

According to the organization’s website, “The annual Ridenhour Prizes recognize those who persevere in acts of truth-telling that protect the public interest, promote social justice or illuminate a more just vision of society. These prizes memorialize the spirit of fearless truth-telling that whistleblower and investigative journalist Ron Ridenhour reflected throughout his extraordinary life and career. Each Prize carries a $10,000 stipend.” Prize categories include the Courage, Book, and Documentary Film Prizes, as well as a special Prize for Truth Telling “presented to a citizen, corporate or government whistleblower, investigative journalist, or organization for bringing a specific issue of social importance to the public’s attention.” In today’s contentious cultural and political climate, with unfounded accusations of “fake news” and the press being unjustly called “the enemy of the people,” it is refreshing and encouraging to know that the Ridenhour group gives important recognition for outstanding defenders of the real truth.

 

The word “truth” appears over two hundred times in most Bible translations. Isaiah refers to “the God of truth” (Isaiah 65:16); Malachi 2:6 speaks of “the truth that was in (Christ’s) mouth;” and Proverbs 3:3 warns, “Let not mercy and truth forsake you…write them upon the table of your heart.” The Gospel of John uses the word “truth” twenty-three times, beginning Chapter One by saying that Christ “came from the Father, full of grace and truth.” The prize we receive for believing in Christ is a truth that cannot be contested.

 

Lord of All Truth, challenge us to live in truth and justice, as You would do. Amen

 

Both candid and humorous, insightful and ponderous, Meg Blaine Corrigan’s memoir, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, takes the reader through her chaotic childhood with an alcoholic mother and enabling father to a violent assault that nearly ended her life. She populates her tale with vivid descriptions of her parents, other influential adults, the attacker, and her disastrous first marriage. But this story has a happy ending, when Meg finds solace in a God she didn’t think she’d ever believe in, when He gently helps her heal from her past lives and move into the best times of her life. Meg has also written a novel, Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist, about said first marriage, as well as a Christian devotional, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, comprised of blogs from this site. Stay tuned for sequels to her last two books! All of her works may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

GREAT LEADERS BUILD BRIDGES

Christ Bridge to GodFor it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— not by works, so that no one can boast. Ephesians 23:8-9

 

When I accepted Christ as my personal savior, I was twenty-nine years old. I had not attended church regularly in my life; I knew nothing about the Bible and what it meant. But my sister had once given me a King James version of God’s Word, and I discovered that I could suddenly read and understand the text somewhat. Knowing I needed much more understanding, I enrolled in a weeks-long course called the Bethel Series, which used graphic illustrations to help those in the class remember what various Scripture passages meant. The one I remember the most clearly to this day is the illustration of the cross of Christ bridging the gap between humankind (me) and sin (also me), leading to reunion and reconciliation with God.

 

I soon began to understand that (a) by my very nature as a human being, I am a sinner, falling short of God’s glory, and (b) I didn’t need to do anything because Christ’s death on the cross had already bridged the gap between me and God. His cross stood for Grace, the unearned, unmerited forgiveness of my faults, shortcomings, stupid behavior, and all the rest that I thought was a permanent stain on my life. Gone. Just like that. And after several decades of following Christ, I am still gob smacked that, in spite of my continued “humanness,” the Lord’s mercies are new every morning.

 

Over the years, I have realized how inexplicably intertwined my career path of social work and counseling have been with my faith walk. I have always been an empath, showing heartfelt compassion and caring for those I met in my life. But being a practicing Christian deepened the meaning behind that concern for others and filled in the cracks with renewed purpose. And in all my work years, I could clearly see that effective leaders—including myself—build bridges to connect people. How else, I asked myself often, would we ever get “unstuck” without the bridges? It had worked for me in a simple introductory religion class, and it works for all of us.

 

Jesus, strengthen us to follow Your example and create bridges to wholeness for others. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. To date, she has written nearly 700 different devotions, filling one book of daily readings, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she had hoped would be completed by now. She posts once a week, which means in seven years, she will have enough entries to fill a second book. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing, so Meg is pacing herself, enjoying spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg is involved in volunteer work at her church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and also with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .

OPTIMIST AT THE APOCALYPSE

Optimist at the Apocalypse“Do you see all these great buildings?” replied Jesus. “Not one stone here will be left on another; every one will be thrown down….” Peter, James, John and Andrew asked Him privately, “Tell us, when will these things happen? And what will be the sign that they are about to be fulfilled?” Mark 13:2-4

 

I recently read an article describing a prominent female political figure as “an optimist at the Apocalypse.” I did not agree with that assessment, and no, I won’t name the political figure or the writer! But I began to think what that would mean to stand watching this world spin out of control and out of existence and be optimistic about that event. Webster defines “optimist” as “a person who is inclined to be hopeful and to expect good outcomes.” And the Apocalypse is described as “the expectation of an imminent cosmic cataclysm in which God destroys the ruling powers of evil and raises the righteous to life in a messianic kingdom.” So observing this “cosmic cataclysm” with mirth and glee might not be everyone’s picture of the “end times.” Hollywood has made many people very rich producing disaster movies that bring viewers to the edges of their theater seats if not their sanity. It is downright scary to consider being a witness to the earth’s demise!

 

The Gospel of Mark recounts Jesus telling the disciples a bit about what the end times will be like. He speaks of false prophets, deception, “wars and rumors of wars,” earthquakes, and famines (Mark 13:6-8). But still the timing of the end will not be clear to us. Many cling to the promise that “the gospel must first be preached to all nations” (v. 10) before the end will come. But we are not to concern ourselves with what we must say if asked to tell why we believe in God’s merciful love, kindness and justice. Jesus says, “Just say whatever is given you at the time, for it is not you speaking, but the Holy Spirit” (v. 14).

 

Why is it whenever the disciples—like us—are freaking out about life, Christ just raising His holy hand and says, “Fear not?” Well, if there ever was an “optimist at the Apocalypse,” friends and neighbors, that would be Jesus Himself.

 

Lord, You say “Fear not.” Teach us to trust You today and always. Amen

 

Alone on a Colorado mountain, Meg Corrigan faced the unthinkable, a situation that almost ended her life. Learn the details of her astounding rescue from the hands of a gun-wielding attacker and how she walked off that mountain. Hers is a story of tragedy turned holy, a journey of sorrow and healing, a powerful message of hope in the darkest hour. In her memoir, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, Meg credits her resilience to the grace of God. She is also the author of Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist, tales based on her years as a drummer in a Hawaiian show band; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, released this month. Meg is a retired college counselor, author, speaker, trainer and sexual assault survivor. She speaks to churches, civic groups, college students, mental health professionals and law enforcement personnel, as well as youth in juvenile facilities. She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota with her husband, Patrick. She loves to coax seemingly dead plants out of the soil in her yard. The couple have four daughters, ten grandchildren and a great-grandchild on the way. Contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net or www.MegCorrigan.com .

CRUISE CONTROL

Cruise Control“Who touched me?” Jesus asked. When they all denied it, Peter said, “Master, the people are crowding and pressing against you.” Luke 8:45

 

There was a frozen fog the morning I picked Agnes up at the farm. Her only child, Edgar, stood peering at me from the barn. I went in the house and helped Agnes pack her one small suitcase, but I didn’t see Edgar sneak in behind me. We turned to leave, his mother hugged him. He looked straight at me and said, “Take care of her.” “I will,’ I said. After forty-six years of marriage, Agnes, a sixty-five year-old farm wife of an alcoholic and violently abusive man, was going to a women’s shelter seventy miles away. The public health nurse had told me the family were “backward.” Edgar did two years in the Army but came right home to help his mother. Seventy milk cows and thirty stanchions meant lots of bellering in the cow yard. His father Alfred could not be counted on. The corn stood unharvested. I didn’t know which was greener: the young county social worker picking Agnes up or the withering stocks in the field.

 

Oddly, we passed Alfred on the gravel road as he was returning to the farm, driving the tractor because he had lost his license for driving drunk. Agnes didn’t even duck, and Alfred wouldn’t know my vehicle anyway. I hit the highway and set the cruise. Agnes stared wide-eyed. “The car drives herself?” she asked. “How can thaThe shelter staff saw Agnes to her tiny room and explained the daily schedule. We all feared she would not fit in with the younger women and their small children at the shelter. But Agnes surprised us. She became the “house mother” to all those new moms; their children flocked to their new “grandma.” Agnes had been courageous to leave her abusive husband. She had turned off the “cruise control” of her daily life of sorrow and found a place where she was useful and cared for. Just as the woman who touched the robe of Christ found there was hope for healing and new life, Agnes found a way to begin again.

 

Lord of Justice, the hands of those suffering domestic violence are reaching out for help. Show them ways to break the chains that bind them and lead then to better lives. Amen

 

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. If you or someone you know suffers at the hands of an abuser, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-7997233. Is this abuse? Follow this link: https://www.thehotline.org/is-this-abuse/

ALL GROWN UP

Children CareersSpeaking the truth in love, we must grow up in every way into Him who is the head, into Christ. Ephesians 4:15

 

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up? I alternated between cowgirl, ballet dancer, and rock star before I was six years old. Then I discovered art, and that’s all I wanted to do, all the time. I did study art, but eventually settled on counseling, and I was pleased with the career I had chosen. When I became a parent, I had lofty dreams for my two daughters. Mostly, like just about every parent, I wanted them to find their way to become mature, independent, healthy adults. A satisfying work life would be a bonus. As most parents would do, I tried my best to instill in my children the ideals and values that I thought would serve them best, even as I was painfully aware that I had been a latecomer to some of those values. I prayed constantly that my own chaotic childhood would not be the legacy I would leave with my daughters.

 

It’s odd that human beings are deemed “mature” when they are able to leave their parents’ homes and create lives of their own. But maturity in Christ is different. In Chapter 4 of his letter to the church in Ephesus, Paul reminded the people of the gifts God gave to each of them: “…some would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers…” (Ephesians 4:11). The point of everyone embracing and using individual gifts was to reach “…maturity, to the measure of the full stature of Christ” (v. 13). This growth, or maturing, should take us into Christ, being ever more dependent on Him, and leaning not on our own understanding (Proverbs 3:5). As we leave our parents’ watchful guidance, we are advised to turn instead to the wisdom of the Lord Who regards us as one of His beloved children. In adulthood, it is He Who equips us to lead balanced, blessed and healthy lives. Staying on God’s path is a daily—sometimes hourly or minute-by-minute—application of the principles at the forefront of my mind. I know when I have deviated because I can feel the chill of walking without my Lord.

 

Jesus, more of You and less of me. Grow me up in You! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan is the author of three books: Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child; Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian. She holds a Master’s Degree in Counseling from the University of New Mexico and has over thirty years’ experience working with survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, war veterans, and other trauma survivors.  Her books may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

ETERNAL IMPLICATIONS

EternityFor salvation is nearer to us now than when we became believers; the night is far gone, the day is near. Let us then lay aside the works of darkness and put on the armor of light…live honorably…,not in quarreling and jealousy. Instead, put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to gratify its desires. Romans 13:11-14

 

It was a terrible week. We had just buried my father in Las Vegas, Nevada. I had flown back to Minnesota with my mother, placing her in an assisted living facility in spite of her pleading me to let her come and live with me and my new husband. I would not last a week with my mother, an eighty-nine year-old chronic alcoholic, living under the same roof as us. But I promised my father I would look after her, and I was doing the best I could. I was being laid off from the college where I worked, and I wasn’t sure I would have another job to go to at the end of the school year. With no time off left, I was trying to liquidate my parents’ home and belongings in Las Vegas via phone and email. A nursing assistant who had cared for my father asked to buy two recliners, but requested I hold the check until the first of the month. In the midst of all this chaos, the check fell out of my purse at a drugstore while I was filling my new prescription for anti-anxiety medication.

 

The pharmacist found the check and called the nursing assistant in Las Vegas. She called me and came unglued. She berated me first for losing the check, then for not being with my father when he died, then for “uprooting” my mother and dragging her to Minnesota in the middle of the winter. For what seemed like a very long time, I listened to her abuse and prayed for serenity. God delivered in spades. I took a deep breath and told her to keep the recliners, no payment was necessary. I thanked her for taking care of my parents when I could not. I am not always so gracious, but with God’s help, I made the best of an awful situation.

 

Jesus, Lord of Peace, help us see the eternal implications of our actions. Keep us in perfect peace. Amen

 

Alone on a Colorado mountain, Meg Corrigan faced the unthinkable, a situation that almost ended her life. Hear the details of her astounding rescue from the hands of a gun-wielding attacker and how she walked off that mountain. Hers is a story of tragedy turned holy, a journey of sorrow and healing, a powerful message of hope in the darkest hour. In her memoir, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, Meg credits her resilience to the grace of God. She is also the author of Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist, tales based on her years as a drummer in a Hawaiian show band; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, released this month. Meg is a retired college counselor, author, speaker, trainer and sexual assault survivor. She is a member of the RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network) Speakers’ Bureau. She speaks to churches, civic groups, college students, mental health professionals and law enforcement personnel, as well as youth in juvenile facilities. She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota with her husband, Patrick. She loves to coax seemingly dead plants out of the soil in her yard. The couple have four daughters, ten grandchildren and a great-grandchild on the way. Contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net or www.MegCorrigan.com .

NAMASTE IN BED

“You shall therefore lay up these words of Mine in your heart and in your soul, and you shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be as frontlets between your eyes.” Deuteronomy 11:18

My massage therapist Mary also teaches “Soma Yoga,” which is “slow, gentle exercises that re-educate the nervous system and allow the release of tight, restricted muscles, thereby promoting healing” (yogapedia.com). During the pandemic lockdown, Mary recorded herself giving several soma yoga lessons and provided them to her clients online for free. On one video, I saw her performing both standing moves and some lying on a mat. Since I can no longer get down on the floor and back up again without a forklift involved, I needed to adapt the exercises. Thus, I turned off my computer and ate several chocolate chip cookies. The next time I talked to Mary, she said, “Lie down on your bed with your laptop and do the session there.” But her recorded voice was so soothing that I ended up taking a ninety-minute nap. By now I was beginning to doubt my commitment to soma yoga, as well as my efforts to stop gaining weight during the lockdown. I could easily blame it all on the pandemic, along with my inability to balance my checkbook, my failure to write consistently in spite of a looming literary deadline,  and my desire to binge watch Star Trek reruns with my Treckie husband.

One thing I did not let slide during the lockdown was the maintenance of my spiritual “fitness.” I continued to read my daily devotions, recording my reflections on how the Scripture passages impacted my life. I collected ideas for these devotions which I later compiled into usable 400-word iterations. And I participated in our church’s prayer chain, praying for congregation members, the community, our nation and the world at large. There was and continues to be much to pray for. Moses recounted to the Israelites Yahweh’s orders for them to wear His Word as a sign on their hands and between their eyes (Deuteronomy 11:18). “Phylacteries” were small vessels containing Scripture, forerunners of spiritual practices we keep today. Keeping “fit” in the Spirit helps me live for Christ, and I might just try that soma yoga soon too!

Lord, we thank You for Your Word which keeps us spiritually fit. Amen