THE BATTLE STILL RAGES

Traumatized SoldierHave I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go. Joshua 1:9

 

When I was a child, my family visited my mother’s brother Norvel and his wife Mabel. Norvel had been an American soldier in Germany during World War I. During trench combat, he was one of many soldiers exposed to “mustard gas,” a toxic chemical used liberally by all the “antagonistic” nations during that way, including Germany. Although the use of chemicals in warfare had been banned worldwide in 1899 and 1907, the practice killed and wounded 1.3 million allied soldiers during World War I. Besides coping with lung problems, Norvel also experienced “shell shock”—now called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder—from the psychological wounds of war. Aunt Mabel scolded her husband when he tried to talk to us about what happened to him. “We don’t talk about the war,” she said.

 

Fortunately for our veterans, nations throughout the world have come a long way in the understanding of and treatment for both medical and psychological combat experiences. The symptoms haven’t changed: my Uncle Norvel and many other veterans past and present carry the scars of war with them every day. It is commonly accepted today that the path to recovery from trauma is to talk about one’s feelings, sometimes—but not always—recounting the exact atrocities that occurred. How sad for my uncle and countless others past and present who have not been allowed or felt comfortable speaking about the unspeakable.

 

It has been said that courage is not the absence of fear; courage is fear that has said its prayers. The Old Testament recounts many tales of fierce battles fought by the people of God. They were never promised that the battles would be easy, but they were given Someone to turn to when the situation seemed unbearable. As long as flawed human beings live at odds with each other in this world, there will be conflict. But God promises to be with us through any battles we face. He will uphold us with His righteous hand. The victory belongs to the Lord.

 

Heavenly Father, on this and all Veteran’s Day, stir us to give thanks for the brave men and women who fight to preserve freedom and justice in this world. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan is the author of three books: Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child; Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian. She holds a Master’s Degree in Counseling from the University of New Mexico and has over thirty years’ experience working with survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, war veterans, and other trauma survivors.  Her books may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

WHY DOESN’T SHE JUST LEAVE?

The Battered DoorHusbands, love your wives, just as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her, so that she may be holy and without blemish….husbands should love their wives as they do their own bodies. He who loves his wife loves himself. Ephesians 5:25, 27-28

 

A friend’s Facebook post reminded me of my long-ago job as a county social worker helping victims of domestic violence. Rarely did one of these victims—mostly women—leave her partner; rarer still did she have money to hire an attorney. I often accompanied the woman to court, to face her batterer and his attorney. I was an advocate, not a legal representative, and I was raked over the coals in those courtrooms. One of the most frequent questions asked by the man’s attorney was, “If it was so bad, why didn’t she leave a long time ago?” The complex answer to that question was the subject of my friend’s Facebook post, written by a woman named Rachel Smith:

 

Because he has her so brainwashed that it’s all her fault…she’s no good to anyone…no one will want her or love her…there’s no way she can possibly make it on her own. She thinks that if she just tries harder…if she’s a better wife and a better mom maybe he will be happy with her and wouldn’t get so angry. And maybe he will be the same sweet, charming man that he was when they first met. He has her convinced that if she leaves, he will hurt or kill her or her family. He has threatened to tell the judge she is a bad mom and she will lose her kids and never see them again. He has taken away her money and convinced her that she cannot make it on her own financially and she will always need him.

 

More people are concerned with why women stay in abusive relationships than why men are abusing women. Unless you’ve been in an abusive relationship people have no idea how hard it is to escape. Abusers fool those outside the home because they usually only abuse those inside the home.

They need your support. They need your love. They do not need your judgement.

 

Jesus, You said husbands and wives are to be subject to one another out of reverence to You. Help us end domestic violence throughout the world. Amen

 

OCTOBER IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH. PLEASE REMEMBER THAT THESE VICTIMS DID NOT ASK TO BE ABUSED. REMEMBER TOO THAT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS A FAMILY DISEASE AND A SYSTEMIC PROBLEM IN OUR NATION AND IN OUR WORLD.

MY ROAD TO DAMASCUS

Paul on the Road to DamascusI regard everything as loss because of the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. Philippians 3:8

 

The Apostle Paul could have been ashamed of the life he led before he met Christ. After Jesus’ miraculous deeds on earth, Paul stood on the sidelines and watched Jerusalem’s religious authorities stone Stephen, an avid follower of Christ (Acts 7:58). As a devout Jew, Paul believed Jesus was a fraud. He made it his mission to eradicate as many followers of Jesus’ way as he could. Acts 9:1 finds Paul “still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord.” But Jesus surprised him on the road to Damascus (Acts 9:3-9) and Paul was never the same. At first, many of Christ’s followers rejected Paul, not believing that he had indeed been converted. Eventually, Paul was able to convince other followers of Christ’s way of his own conversion, and he became one of the fiercest advocates for the advance of the early church. He travelled extensively, and eventually told the citizens of Philippi, “For (Christ’s) sake I have suffered the loss of all things, and I regard them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ” (Philippians 3:8).

 

Because of the dramatic way in which I came to accept Jesus Christ as my Savior and Lord, I have often compared myself to Paul. While I could never have been accused of “breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord” in my former life, I was quite jaded about the very existence of God. I grew up in a time when women were becoming “liberated,” and for me that meant no one was in charge of me! I had developed an attitude that I was the captain of my life, and whatever I chose to say, do or think was perfectly fine. The only problem was that I was never happy in that state of mind. When God literally sent a bolt of lightning down onto my “road to Damascus,” In love and mercy, God pursued me relentlessly until I finally reached the end of my very dismal existence and laid down my life for Him. I can say with Paul that my former life was “rubbish” compared to the joy and peace I now have every day, thanks to my living Lord.

 

Praise You, Lord, for redeeming me as Your child! Amen

 

Both candid and humorous, insightful and ponderous, Meg Blaine Corrigan’s memoir, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, takes the reader through her chaotic childhood with an alcoholic mother and enabling father to a violent assault that nearly ended her life. She populates her tale with vivid descriptions of her parents, other influential adults, the attacker, and her disastrous first marriage. But this story has a happy ending, when Meg finds solace in a God she didn’t think she’d ever believe in, when He gently helps her heal from her past lives and move into the best times of her life. Meg has also written a novel, Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist, about said first marriage, as well as a Christian devotional, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, comprised of blogs from this site. Stay tuned for sequels to her last two books! All of her works may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

TELL ME A STORY

Jesus Telling a StoryHe replied, “God has granted you to know the meaning of these parables, for they tell a great deal about the Kingdom of God.” Luke 8:10

 

In November 1969, a minor miracle occurred on the American Public Broadcasting Service when Sesame Street debuted. Creators Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett teamed up with puppeteer Jim Henson and a host of producers and writers to create a new type of children’s television show with educational goals and a curriculum.  Henson’s “Muppets,” as they are called, interact with each other and with human actors to convey learning concepts that prepare very young children for school—particularly children from low-income families. Techniques such as song, repetition, and humor were used, and almost immediately, educators and social scientists began weighing in on what methods would improve the children’s educational experience. Social competence, tolerance of diversity, and nonaggressive ways of resolving conflict were introduced. And later, some real-life crises like the September 11th terrorist attacks and Hurricane Katrina were addressed. It was clear to the creators, researchers, critics, and the children themselves that the story lines on Sesame Street gained kids’ attention and taught them not just how to learn, but how to cope with and solve life issues.

 

Jesus knew the telling of stories was an effective way to teach people about the kingdom of God. A “parable” is described as “an earthly story with a heavenly meaning.” In Matthew 13:11-15, Jesus explained to the disciples that they had been given special understanding of the Word of the Lord. But, as was prophesied in the 6th chapter of Isaiah, the average people of the time had closed their ears and no longer listened to the Lord’s warnings. So when Jesus went to explain the kingdom of God to the people, He used stories as examples of how God’s kingdom worked. A lamp as the Light of the World; a kind Samaritan showing caring for another; weeds in the wheat crop; the pearl of great price were all illustrations of God’s work on earth.

 

When I speak in public about God’s miraculous work in my own life, I always start with a story and I use stories throughout my talks. Like the producers of Sesame Street—and Jesus—have shown, the stories are what get a point across best.

 

Story-Teller God, shine through us in the stories we tell. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

ALGORITHMS

Algorithm MockupPeter told them, “You know it is against the Jewish laws for me to come into a Gentile home like this. But God has shown me in a vision that I should never think of anyone as inferior.” Acts 10:28

 

Wikipedia.org provides an “informal” definition of an “algorithm” as “a set of rules that precisely defines the sequence of operations, which would include all computer programs….Algorithms are essential to the way computers process data.” I recently read an article explaining that social media platforms use algorithms to determine what people like and to bombard them with advertisements for those things. Thus, our computer usage keeps us in somewhat of an “information bubble” where we are only exposed to the same things over and over again—unless and until we express an interest in something else. If you only like cupcakes, your computer screen will continue to show you cupcakes until you demonstrate that you also like fudge, and then you will be bombarded with both fudge and cupcakes.

 

This pattern would seem to stymie our exposure to diverse life experiences. Indeed, algorithms help companies develop “target markets” where cupcake manufacturers don’t waste their time with fudge lovers. But this type of marketing also keeps us from learning that we might like fudge. How would we know if we are never exposed to fudge?

 

Peter had a vision of the heavens opening up and a large sheet being lowered containing “all sorts of animals, snakes, and birds forbidden to the Jews for food” (Acts 10:12). A voice said, “Go kill and eat any of them you wish.” Peter’s “algoriths,” as it were, caused him to reply that he would never eat unfamiliar things “forbidden by (the) Jewish law” (v. 13). But the response was, “Don’t contradict God!” The vision was repeated three times. Shortly thereafter, Peter was summoned to Caesarea to meet with Cornelius, a Roman officer, “a good and godly man, well-thought of by the Jews” (v.22). Cornelius, a Gentile but clearly a believer in God, beseeches Peter to enter his home and spend time with him. Peter “algorithms” are radically changed when he realizes that his vision was not about food, but about God’s ability to cleanse the hearts of people other than the Jews. He accepts Cornelius’ invitation.

 

Lord, free us from the “algorithms” of sameness, and move us to love all of Your precious children! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

 

POST TRAUMATIC GROWTH

Light in the DarknessBut for you who revere My name, the Sun of Righteousness will rise with healing in His wings. And you will go free, leaping with joy like calves let out to pasture. Malachi 4:2

 

Army Surgeon Rhonda Cornum’s helicopter was shot down in Iraq in 1991 during Operation Desert Storm. Her injuries were many but not life-threatening. She was captured by Iraqi soldiers, a situation which checked all the boxes for post-traumatic stress: a mock-execution, near death experience, sexual assault, helplessness in the face of the enemy. But Cornum refused to succumb to the terror by immediately beginning to focus on how she could improve her life when she survived. Cornum says resilience is like a muscle: it strengthens when exercised and atrophies when neglected. She was released by her captors within a week and eventually directed the U.S. Army’s Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Program. Today, every Army soldier goes through resilience training; psychologists believe the training can help individuals in all walks of life to survive and thrive following any type of trauma.

 

Two researchers, Richard Tedeschi and Lawrence Calhoun, coined the phrase “post-traumatic growth.” After working with survivors of cancer, severe injury, war, and other traumas, the men identified growth in five main areas: personal strength, relationships, life perspective, appreciation of circumstances (thankfulness), and spirituality. As a survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint with a clear threat that I might not live, I concur with Tedeschi and Calhoun: I became a stronger person because I had seen myself at my most vulnerable. For me, God’s gracious love and healing meant a brand new start for me. I did not “deserve” to be assaulted nor to be threatened with imminent death; the perpetrator was a monster by all accounts. But when I survived, I had a clear choice: to succumb to the fear and panic rising in my mind, or to move forward with my life and heal. I chose God’s healing.

 

I have talked to many whose trauma has left them in a precarious place, but I believe there is much hope in studies like the one on “post-traumatic growth.” Skilled therapists using these sensible techniques can guide trauma survivors into optimism, hope, and resilience to help them live productive and meaningful lives.

 

God of Grace and Healing, touch the broken places in survivors of trauma and lead them to trust in Your loving goodness. Amen

 

Both candid and humorous, insightful and ponderous, Meg Blaine Corrigan’s memoir, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, takes the reader through her chaotic childhood with an alcoholic mother and enabling father to a violent assault that nearly ended her life. She populates her tale with vivid descriptions of her parents, other influential adults, the attacker, and her disastrous first marriage. But this story has a happy ending, when Meg finds solace in a God she didn’t think she’d ever believe in, when He gently helps her heal from her past lives and move into the best times of her life. Meg has also written a novel, Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist, about said first marriage, as well as a Christian devotional, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, comprised of blogs from this site. Stay tuned for sequels to her last two books! All of her works may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

JUSTICE

JusticeHe will not break a bruised reed or quench a smoldering wick until he brings justice to victory. Matthew 12:20

 

Jeffrey Epstein is dead. This week the billionaire American financier, indicted on numerous charges for running an international child sex trafficking ring, was found dead in his jail cell by apparent suicide. His victims thought this was their last best hope of obtaining justice for his kidnapping, rape, and “sale” of possibly hundreds of underaged girls.  Now, his co-conspirators (some female) and other men named in the court proceedings are shouting for joy, believing Epstein’s death will give them a pass from a similar fate to his. His victims may try to bring civil charges, but it won’t be quite the same without the monster in the courtroom, facing his victims.

 

What is to be said of justice that never comes? Of peace of mind that is ripped from the survivors’ hands and hearts? Of a real sense of closure lost to the winds of fate? Our indwelling sense of right and wrong says offenders should be punished and victims protected. Deuteronomy 3:4 says The Rock, His work is perfect, for all His ways are justice. A God of faithfulness and without iniquity, just and upright is He. His justice is compared to a plumb line, ever straight, never faltering (Isaiah 28:17).

 

There is no perversion of justice with the Lord our God (2 Chronicles 19:7). But human actions are never as “straight” and pure as God’s plumb line. Somewhere, in this broken world, survivors of trauma induced at the hands of others must come to grips with the fact that justice is not always assured, peace is not always promised. We are left to figure out what justice might look like, in the absence of perfect law, perfect courts, perfect circumstances. As a survivor of sexual violence never brought to justice, I have learned a hard lesson, but a good one: sometimes justice is just knowing that God believes us, feels our pain, collects our tears in a bottle, and tells us, “Keep going, My child, you are precious in My sight and for that reason alone, you must keep going.”

 

God of Justice, hold close to You those who never see justice in this world. Help them know Your justice prevails in the end. Amen

NO MORE SNATCHING

My sheep hear my voice. I know them, and they follow Me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish. No one will snatch them out of My hand. John 10:27-28

 

Members of the temple leadership asked Jesus if He was really the Messiah. “Jesus answered, ‘The works that I do in My Father’s name testify to Me; but you do not believe, because you do not belong to My sheep.’” The leaders couldn’t understand what He was saying because they did not “belong” to Him. They were “Messiah deniers,” in today’s vernacular. They had seen the miracles Jesus had performed, and they had heard his crystal-clear interpretations of ancient Scripture, but they would not humble themselves to believe that Jesus was the Christ, Who had been foretold in the very Scriptures He now quoted with magnificent authority.

 

As a survivor of a brutal sexual assault at gunpoint—an incident which nearly cost me my life—I am shaken to the core when I hear or read about “sexual violence deniers.” A legislator stated that a woman’s body “shuts down during a true rape,” preventing pregnancy. Arguments have abounded about women “asking for it,” and “men who can’t help themselves.” A talk show host recently opined that women have abortions so they are free to party on a tropical island. My own home state of Minnesota took until 2015 to pass a law that correctly labels sex trafficked minors as victims, not perpetrators. Survivors of sexual violence can tell you that (a) she/he did not ask for it, (b) was not a willing participant, and (c) lives with the trauma from the horrible experience for the rest of her/his life. Women who become pregnant as a result of sexual violence pay double, triple, many times over, regardless of the outcome of that pregnancy.

 

Sexual violence is a global problem which is not going away unless and until “deniers” start hearing the voices of the living survivors as we speak for ourselves and for those of us who did not get to come home. Jesus says those who know Him will not be “snatched” from His loving embrace. His sheep “know” His voice, the voice of peace and love and compassion. All we can ask is for deniers to just listen.

 

Lord, we know we live in a broken and hurting world. We ask that Your voice will be heard throughout the globe, and that we will end sexual violence of all types soon. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

HUMANITARIAN. CHRIST. US.

Kids In CagesBlessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Matthew 5:3

 

Here’s the thing: I feel totally helpless. I watch the news night after night, and some days there is coverage of the unconscionable treatment of migrant children at the southern border of the United States. But most often now, other news cycles dominate the airwaves and we’re “moving on.” I can’t get those images out of my head. As surely as there is a God in heaven, can we agree that this isn’t right? Whether you belong to the Republican or Democratic party, the Coffee party, or the Friday night party, can we just agree: this needs fixing now? Could any person in his right mind take his own child or grandchild—the younger the better—and place her in a cage with a Mylar blanket for a bed on a cement floor, with only the absolute barest of necessities, with perhaps well-meaning but overworked and way understaffed adults to take care of her, to hear the visiting pediatricians’ and child psychologists’ warnings about the enduring emotional and psychological damage these conditions are doing to this child—and not be on his knees with sorrow and compassion in five minutes? Would any person who is not a complete sociopathic lunatic think that this is the way to deal with the global migrant crisis?  Does the color of a person’s skin really make the cut for why these children—and their parents, for that matter—should have to endure these conditions for even one minute? I believe the vast majority know the answer to that question. In our heart of hearts, we know.

 

Then why aren’t all of us totally outraged? Why aren’t we listening? Why aren’t we contacting our people in Washington? Why aren’t we doing more than “sending thots and prayers?” Jesus said, “Go.” He didn’t say watch the news, and say, “Ain’t it awful?” He said, “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:19). The word “therefore” refers back to all that Christ taught. “Teach all nations” means there are NO EXCLUSIONS to those we are called to serve. That includes each child and adult, no matter the nation or color or creed. So go. Go.

 

Healer of All Nations, we implore You to light the path for this nation to work together to solve this migrant crisis now. Amen

 

To locate your Congressional Representatives and Senators in any state in the USA, use this link: https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members

 

Special Note: The Lord woke me up at 4:30 a.m. this morning to write this blog. He’s been telling me to do it for weeks—maybe months—and He finally got my attention by putting Matthew 28:19 on a loop tape in my brain, 24/7, for a couple of weeks. It didn’t “click” until this morning. Lesson learned: I need to stop and listen to what God is telling me!

 

SHINE

you-are-hereI am the Light of the World. John 8:12

 

John’s Gospel is not like the other three. I would call it the “touchy-feely” Gospel, or maybe the most “existential” one. Each of the Gospels relate the story of Jesus’ earthly ministry, death, crucifixion, and resurrection, reflecting the writing style of the four Apostles who wrote them. But John begins his story with a different flair that instantly makes us think: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God” (John 1:1). What a powerful statement! This “Word” that I am reading is…alive! The Word is actually living and breathing. It doesn’t “represent” anything. It’s not just a tale that was handed down through the ages. The Word has power and knowledge, and oh, so much more! “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14).

 

John also uses the word “light” thirty times in his Gospel, and most of the time the word refers directly to Jesus. “In (Christ) was light, and the light was the life of men” (John 1:4). The people loved the light “for a season” (John 5:35), but later rejected the light (John 3:19). But Christ also told the people, “You are the light of the world”  (John 5:14), and He warned us not to hide that light under a basket, to set it on a hill so that “it gives light to all” (John5:14-15). “Let your light shine so before men, that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven” (John 5:15).

 

People don’t “see” light directly, but it is by light that we “see” everything else. That’s why it’s so important for us to “be” that light for others, as Jesus is for us. Imagine what we can each do, if we allow Christ’s light to shine through and in and around us all the time. Jesus just wants our cooperation. He’ll do all the “heavy shining!”

 

Blessed Savior, we thank You that You provide this glorious light for us. We want to be Your partners in the “Shine Business!” Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net