MY CLAY JAR

Broken Clay JarBut we have this treasure in jars of clay to show that this all-surpassing power is from God and not from us. 2 Corinthians 4:7

My “jar”—my body—is falling apart at the seams! To date, I’ve had eleven joint surgeries, three skin cancer surgeries, and miscellaneous other procedures. I have osteoarthritis in multiple joints, hypertension, low potassium, failing eyesight, my memory is not what it used to be, I need to lose some weight, and for some strange reason, I get depressed sometimes. In short, my body is failing me at an alarming rate! But the one thing that does not seem to be failing is my faith in God! In fact, the more that goes wrong, the more I find I rely on God. I have looked to Him to keep me afloat when I am in pain, or facing one of said surgeries, or feeling older in my body than in my mind. He has lifted me from tiny strength to ever-greater strength and assured me that He is with me at every step. He has provided me with a sound mind that allows me to adapt, each and every time, to what will become my “new normal.” And He’s made it clear to me that I have the capacity to flourish in new and unique ways, even if my body cannot perform as it once did.

 

In 2 Corinthians 4, Paul makes it clear that our bodies are frail, but God’s life in us remains powerful. Though we are “hard pressed on every side,” we are “not crushed; perplexed but not in despair; persecuted but not abandoned; struck down but not destroyed” (v. 8). What joy to know that even when our physical health and even our mental health waxes and wanes, our spiritual health is alive in Christ. In this way, “His life may also be revealed in our mortal body” (v. 11). I delight that I still have faith, this great and precious treasure in my clay jar, so that I may always let the light of Christ shine through me. My human capacity may be limited, but “with God all things are possible” (Mark 10:27).

 

How can I show my gratitude, Lord, that You suffered far worse than I can imagine to give me hope for this life and the one to come? Praise Your holy name! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work. She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com   MegCorrigan@comcast.net

SPILLING THE BEANS

Embarrassed-womanWise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, “Where is the Child who has been born King of the Jews?”…(Herod) sent them to Bethlehem, saying, “Go and search diligently for the Child; and when you have found Him, bring me word so that I may also go and pay Him homage.” Matthew 2:1-2, 8

 

Have you ever inadvertently said or done something that you should not have? As a young adult, it seemed I frequently found myself talking to someone I felt I could trust, only to hear later that what I said had been repeated to my embarrassment. I learned from those experiences to be more careful with sharing what was on my mind! I’ve also committed some of those egregious faux pas like asking a woman with a large belly when her baby is due, only to find out that was not the reason for her sizeable tummy! And I once stubbornly tried get into a car that looked like mine, turning to see a woman giving me an icy stare while holding her cell phone aloft as if to call the police. These little embarrassments may cause us momentary horror, but we can usually recover from them with time and gentle self-talk.

 

Epiphany brings the arrival of the Wise Men. Did these Eastern Kings who came to find the baby Jesus have any clue that King Herod was less than thrilled at their report about the newborn “king of the Jews?” They didn’t realize that their innocent question about how to find the Child Whose star they had followed was about to set off an international incident with fatal repercussions for all the children under two in the area (Matthew 2:16-18). I’m certain these Wise Men meant no harm; they were mesmerized by the Christ Star and what ancient texts had foretold about Him (v. 6). Herod was a cunning and cruel king and he took advantage of the men from the East. He wanted this new Baby out of his life and his kingdom. But God would prevail: Joseph was warned in a dream to flee to Egypt with Mary and Jesus, and the Wise Men were also warned to leave the area without letting Herod know where the Child was (vs. 12-15).

 

Sovereign Lord, we thank You that Your plans are perfect and evil humans cannot change their course. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

OVERWHELMING DEBT

Woman managing the debtLet no debt remain outstanding, except the continuing debt to love one another, for whoever loves others has fulfilled the law. Romans 13:8

 

In today’s world of uncertain medical coverage and greedy health providers, an entire family’s resources can be threatened or wiped out by one catastrophic illness. Just ask the 472 families across Arkansas and Texas who recently found out that their medical bills of hundreds and in some cases thousands of dollars were being paid off by a church in a state a thousand miles from them. A Lord of Life Church member in Brooklyn Park, a suburb of Minneapolis, told his pastor about “RIP Medical Debt,” a non-profit led by two former debt collectors familiar with the health industry. RIP buys debt from hospitals and providers with funds donated from celebrities, churches, and other organizations. The debt is bought up for pennies on the dollar, so even modest donations can eliminate a huge debt for those who have no other way to pay their medical bills. Lord of Life Church raised $15,000 in the fall of 2019, enough to pay off $1.6 million in medical debt! So why didn’t they use the money in their (my) home state of Minnesota? Well, state protections in Minnesota limit the purchase of debt. Undaunted, Lord of Life decided it would still use the money to help people in some of the poorer parts of our nation; hence, the gifts went towards medical bills for families in two southern states. (The church has plans to raise more money to help locals with medical debt.)

 

In Romans 13:8, the Apostle Paul speaks of our compelling responsibility to love others, thereby fulfilling the second part of Christ’s Great Commandment (Matthew 22:37-40: Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. ‘This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.”). How can mere mortals love with that much surety and abandon? By never doubting the power of God to direct our efforts to the right person in the right place at the right time!

 

Giver of All Good Gifts, open our hands and hearts and help us to love with surety and abandon. Amen

 

For more information about the RIP Medical Debt program, or to make a donation, go to: https://ripmedicaldebt.org/

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger, to the delight of all who read her work and hear her speak. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a master’s degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

RESTING GRINCH FACE

grinch1.0A cheerful heart is a good medicine,  but a downcast spirit dries up the bones. Proverbs 17:22

 

We’ve all met them. They seem to be everywhere during the Christmas season. Some people just can’t get into the mood for Christ’s birth, no matter what anyone says to them. If you wish them a Merry Christmas, they scowl at you or just turn and walk away. They suck the energy right out of the office Christmas party, and they haunt family gatherings. They won’t tell us what’s bothering them, or what has set them off. They aren’t happy about it being Christmas and they are going to try hard to make the rest of us unhappy too.

 

What do we do about people who spend the entire Advent season wearing a “resting Grinch face?” We can try to console them, engage them in a positive conversation about something, anything! Maybe they have bad memories of Christmas past. I know a woman whose parents were divorced whose only childhood memories of Christmas were about being shuffled from one parent’s home to the other, with little time to enjoy or appreciate either side of the family. Others may associate Christ’s birth with their own feelings of inadequacy or shame or guilt. Grieving for the loss of a loved one, a job, one’s health, or a relationship can add to the holiday blues. Some folks are genuinely turned off by the commercialization of this sacred occasion (count me among them!). And still more people dread being alone on Christmas because there isn’t a single person with whom they can plan to spend the holiday.

 

The “resting Grinch faces” of the world need our understanding and compassion, not our judgement. Holiday blues are different from mental illness, but short-term mental health problems can lead to clinical anxiety and depression. One of the best ways to help people who are unhappy during the Holidays is to include them in our lives and our activities. We may need to remain vigilant and be patient. The season is short, but Christ came not to condemn us but to offer us peace and healing. He would want us to keep that uppermost in our minds.

 

Child of Wonder, You came to us when the world was hurting, just as it is now. Help us spread the light of Your love now and all year long. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. To date, she has written nearly 700 different devotions, filling one book of daily readings, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she had hoped would be completed by now. She posts once a week, which means in seven years, she will have enough entries to fill a second book. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing, so Meg is pacing herself, enjoying spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg is involved in volunteer work at her church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and also with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .

ROCK ON, LITTLE DRUMMER BOY!

Little Drummer Boy ComicalPraise him with tambourine and dance; praise Him with strings and pipe! Psalm 150:4

 

“The Little Drummer Boy,” originally known as “Carol of the Drum,” is a song written by American classical music composer and teacher Katherine Kennicott Davis in 1941. The Trapp Family Singers first recorded the song in 1951; many other recordings and performances followed. A twelfth-century French legend is said to have been the inspiration for the song. The lyrics tell of a poor boy who was invited by the Maji to come see the Baby Jesus in His manger. The boy had no gift for the Infant King, but he played his little drum. The boy says, “I played my best for Him,” and “He smiled at me.”

 

This song has long had a special meaning for me, since I play trap set drums in our church’s contemporary band. During Advent, we play seasonal traditional and contemporary songs in the worship services. Christmas Eve is filled with special music from all our music groups—choir, bells, youth, solos, instrumentalists, as well as our band. With my husband on bass guitar, and others playing keyboards, rhythm guitar, congas, horns, and several of us singing, it is an honor and a delight to lead worship on such a sacred night. I am encouraged by the words of the psalmist, telling of those ancient people of God using all kinds of musical instruments in worship. I cannot imagine a church service, baptism, wedding or funeral without instrumental and vocal offerings, and I am humbled to be a part of our worship music.

 

The story of The Little Drummer Boy is fanciful; it is highly unlikely that a real boy possessing a drum was around Bethlehem the night of our Lord’s birth. But the point of the tale is that each of us has unique “gifts” to offer in service to our King. Galatians 5:22 names but a few of these special gifts: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness. Believers all over this diverse world can fill in the blanks with others: hospitality, discernment, lifting others up, fighting oppression. Volunteer opportunities abound in healthcare, childcare, ending hunger, teaching, ecology, protecting wildlife. Can you bring your unique gift to the Christ Child this Christmas? Opportunities are as varied as the human imagination.

 

Jesus, stir us to bring our gifts to You this Christmas. Amen

DRESS FOR SUCCESS

Dress for SuccessAs God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience. Colossians 3:12

 

When I was working as a counselor in our state’s two-year college system, there were some unwritten rules about how men and women staff should dress. The atmosphere was casual, compared to some corporate settings. But the expectation was still there, that we would dress in a professional manner reflecting the setting of an institution of higher learning. Many of our students dressed better than we did, especially those retraining after leaving other types of employment. We encouraged students to wear clothing similar to that which they would wear when they finished their training and went to work in their chosen field. But there were always some students who decidedly marched to the beat of their own drummer when it came to their clothing. I realize there may have been a generation gap, and maybe a values gap too. But more than once, we found ourselves faced with students in quirky if not inappropriate clothing. Pajamas, droopy pants, tee shirts screaming profanity, clingy tube tops, prom dresses…the list went on and on. It was often a real challenge to impress on some people that how they dress might affect the outcome of an eventual job interview. Lord have mercy, there were days that some of us felt like throwing in the towel—lest some student decide to wear that!

 

As Christians, we are to be mindful of the “clothes” we wear. Colossians 3:12 instructs us to put on the clothes of Christ. This doesn’t mean that we are to wear a long flax robe with a cord belt and sandals. To “clothe” ourselves with Christ means to “put on, develop, exercise or display” the manner which Jesus emulated and taught when He lived among the people. “Clothing” ourselves like Christ is akin to demonstrating the “fruits of the Spirit” listed in Galatians 5:22-23. “Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control” are the attributes that we must seek to “put on” as we walk this earthly walk in Christ’s footsteps. Jesus knows we are not perfect; on a bad day, we might display none of these characteristics. But He forgives us and challenges us to try again.

 

Lord, fill us with Your Spirit that we may be “clothed” in Your grace and glory every day! Amen

 

Both candid and humorous, insightful and ponderous, Meg Blaine Corrigan’s memoir, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, takes the reader through her chaotic childhood with an alcoholic mother and enabling father to a violent assault that nearly ended her life. She populates her tale with vivid descriptions of her parents, other influential adults, the attacker, and her disastrous first marriage. But this story has a happy ending, when Meg finds solace in a God she didn’t think she’d ever believe in, when He gently helps her heal from her past lives and move into the best times of her life. Meg has also written a novel, Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist, about said first marriage, as well as a Christian devotional, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, comprised of blogs from this site. Stay tuned for sequels to her last two books! All of her works may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

 

STARS AT NIGHT

star-night-background-19For now we see in a mirror, dimly, but then we will see face to face. 1 Corinthians 13:12

 

One of my most awe-inspiring experiences in life is to view the stars on a clear night from a location away from city lights and noise. My father, born in 1909, became a pilot in the early days of flight. He wrote my mother a letter once when they were courting. “I flew an hour last night” he said.  “Had a lot of fun. It was overcast, and I went up through the clouds. The moon was shining, and it was just as clear and sparkling as anything.”  Knowing how much he loved flying, I can just imagine his thrill and amazement at those glorious stars shining in the dark night sky as he piloted his aircraft to penetrate those clouds. Perhaps I inherited his love of the sky, because it never ceases to bring tears to my eyes to view the constellations in the heavens on a clear night. The world just fades away in the light of those magnificent stars.

 

I imagine this same sense of awe inspired British song writer Helen Lemmel to pen the words of her famous hymn, “Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus.” Lemmel paraphrased a Sunday school gospel tract when she wrote, “Look full in His wonderful face/and the things of earth will grow strangely dim/in the light of His glory and grace.” I can only imagine what it would be like to see Jesus’s face, to gaze into His eyes and see the light and power and tenderness there. All of the lights of earth—nature’s sun, moon and stars, and every man made source of illumination—would pale in comparison to the radiance of His smile, His peaceful countenance, His all-knowing expression. And to know, seeing His face, that He loves me far more than I could hope or imagine, would be to find perfect peace and contentment. All my worries and fears would melt away in the holding power of just one glance from Christ.

 

The Apostle Paul said, in this earthly life we only “see” Christ dimly, as though viewing Him in a mirror (1 Corinthians 13:12). But when we see Him in heaven, we will view Him with new eyes, and the world will melt away.

 

Bright Star of Heaven, shine for us now and throughout eternity! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan is the author of three books: Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child; Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian. She holds a Master’s Degree in Counseling from the University of New Mexico and has over thirty years’ experience working with survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, war veterans, and other trauma survivors.  Her books may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

CARETAKERS

Mature Vietnamese couple at homeReligion that is pure and undefiled before God, the Father, is this: to care for orphans and widows in their distress, and to keep oneself unstained by the world. James 1:27

 

They are among us. They may be us. They may take care of us. Selfless people who assume responsibility for the care and well being of another, related or not. The young wife and mother who never leaves her husband’s side as he loses his battle with brain cancer. The pastor’s wife, a retired nurse, who provides all daily cares for her husband with dementia for years until finally, they find a place in an assisted living facility they can afford. The high school music teacher whose Guatamalan student must leave the country when his father is deported, but the teacher surprises him with a plane ticket back to sing in the spring music concert. The mother who cares for her son after he suffers profound brain and spinal cord injuries in a motor vehicle accident that kills his brother, until she and her husband raise the funding to build a special home for young adults with acute health issues.

 

These are the quiet legions of people who set aside their own lives, ambitions, dreams and hopes and adjust to a “new normal,” doing the unthinkable for others who are unable to do what needs to be done for themselves. They come from all ethic, religious, cultural and economic backgrounds, turning their faces to the howling winds of pain and discomfort that others endure. They make life easier for others, often while sacrificing sleep, paychecks, nutrition, good health, and companionship themselves, to meet the needs of others. They are shining stars in service to humanity, surely worthy of those stars in their heavenly crowns.

 

This is what Jesus meant when He said to the curious scribe, “You are not far from the kingdom of God” (Mark 12:34). Jesus also told the scribe that the second most important commandment, after love of the one true God, is to “love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:30-31). To care for someone else at our own expense is one of the most noble acts anyone can perform. If you see one—if you are one—if you have one, you are blessed.

 

Jesus, bless and sustain all caregivers, paid or unpaid, and help them know they are valued in Your eyes. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

EMPATHS

Father comforts a sad child. Problems in the familyContinue to remember those in prison as if you were together with them in prison, and those who are mistreated as if you yourselves were suffering. Hebrews 13:3

 

The Wake Up by Catherine Ryan Hyde is a novel about a successful cattle rancher who suddenly “wakes up” to the animals on his ranch. This seemingly seasoned rancher discovers he feels the pain of the animals he raises and sells, rendering him no longer able to conduct “business as usual” on his ranch. His relationship with a young mother and her troubled teenaged son provides more opportunities for the rancher to experience his profound empathy towards both animals and people, completely changing his approach to life and the animals and people he cares about.

 

While reading The Wake Up, I had an epiphany of my own. With over thirty years as a professional counselor, I have always been a “soft heart,” caring a great deal for the students and clients I have worked with. And as an adult child of an alcoholic mother, I have often accepted the role of caretaker in personal relationships, even when that may not be my healthiest role. This book made me realize how much emotion I often invest in concern about people I don’t even know and may never meet. When I see the news about natural disasters, I am often moved to tears with compassion over how much the people and animals are suffering. It nearly does me in to see images of victims of mass shootings, racial hatred, child abuse—and the list goes on and on.

 

It is not lost on my that Jesus was—and is—an empath too. He labored in prayer for His disciples and all of His followers, and even included those persecuting Him and ultimately executing Him in His petitions for forgiveness. The disciples and the Apostle Paul emulated Christ’s compassion; Paul’s letters are mostly passionate pleas for peace and wellbeing for those whose paths he had crossed. It comforts me to know that Jesus bears my burdens too, including the weight of my concern for those whose lives are filled with trouble. I’m not sure I could live in this broken, sorrow-filled world without the grace and love of my Savior to see me through.

 

Jesus, You said there would be trouble in this world, but thank You for overcoming the world! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. To date, she has written nearly 700 different devotions, filling one book of daily readings, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she had hoped would be completed by now. She posts once a week, which means in seven years, she will have enough entries to fill a second book. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing, so Meg is pacing herself, enjoying spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg is involved in volunteer work at her church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and also with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .

BY FAITH

Fifty DollarsBy faith Abraham, when called to go to a place he would later receive as his inheritance, obeyed and went, even though he did not know where he was going. Hebrews 11:8

 

As a counselor in the two-year college system in my home state of Minnesota, I encountered many students who were down on their luck. I kept a $50 bill of my own money in my desk and loaned it to countless students during my time in that position. I told each one of the students who used the loan that they were on their honor to return the money to me when they were able. No one broke the agreement for nearly a decades. And then one day, the $50 was gone. For good. I do not remember who did not return the money to me; it didn’t matter. Circumstances prevented that person from keeping a promise to me. I just hope that the person did some good for someone else along her or his path in life. I had put faith in more students than I ever thought would keep the “loan” going, and everyone—but the last one—had kept the promise.

 

Hebrews 11 recounts many people God asked to trust him, to obey him “by faith.” The chapter is like the “Cliff Notes” of Old Testament saints who did God’s bidding because they had confidence in His everlasting goodness. From Abel to Enoch to Noah to Abraham and Sarah, “all of these people were still living by faith when they died.” (v. 13). How great a faith must it have taken for them to persevere and continue on God’s path even though they would never see the final results of His plan! We must believe that God has a purpose for each of us, no matter how small and insignificant our daily contribution may seem.

 

Each of the students who borrowed that $50 bill did not let the next student in need down. Each returned that money, in essence passing the loan on to someone else. Disappointing as it may have seemed that one final student did not pay the loan back, the faith of the others was passed on countless times. Can we trust daily that God will reward our obedience to Him?

 

Lord, inspire us as You did the saints of old, to trust and obey You daily! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. To date, she has written nearly 700 different devotions, filling one book of daily readings, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she had hoped would be completed by now. She posts once a week, which means in seven years, she will have enough entries to fill a second book. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing, so Meg is pacing herself, enjoying spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg is involved in volunteer work at her church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and also with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .