EMPATHS

Father comforts a sad child. Problems in the familyContinue to remember those in prison as if you were together with them in prison, and those who are mistreated as if you yourselves were suffering. Hebrews 13:3

 

The Wake Up by Catherine Ryan Hyde is a novel about a successful cattle rancher who suddenly “wakes up” to the animals on his ranch. This seemingly seasoned rancher discovers he feels the pain of the animals he raises and sells, rendering him no longer able to conduct “business as usual” on his ranch. His relationship with a young mother and her troubled teenaged son provides more opportunities for the rancher to experience his profound empathy towards both animals and people, completely changing his approach to life and the animals and people he cares about.

 

While reading The Wake Up, I had an epiphany of my own. With over thirty years as a professional counselor, I have always been a “soft heart,” caring a great deal for the students and clients I have worked with. And as an adult child of an alcoholic mother, I have often accepted the role of caretaker in personal relationships, even when that may not be my healthiest role. This book made me realize how much emotion I often invest in concern about people I don’t even know and may never meet. When I see the news about natural disasters, I am often moved to tears with compassion over how much the people and animals are suffering. It nearly does me in to see images of victims of mass shootings, racial hatred, child abuse—and the list goes on and on.

 

It is not lost on my that Jesus was—and is—an empath too. He labored in prayer for His disciples and all of His followers, and even included those persecuting Him and ultimately executing Him in His petitions for forgiveness. The disciples and the Apostle Paul emulated Christ’s compassion; Paul’s letters are mostly passionate pleas for peace and wellbeing for those whose paths he had crossed. It comforts me to know that Jesus bears my burdens too, including the weight of my concern for those whose lives are filled with trouble. I’m not sure I could live in this broken, sorrow-filled world without the grace and love of my Savior to see me through.

 

Jesus, You said there would be trouble in this world, but thank You for overcoming the world! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. To date, she has written nearly 700 different devotions, filling one book of daily readings, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she had hoped would be completed by now. She posts once a week, which means in seven years, she will have enough entries to fill a second book. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing, so Meg is pacing herself, enjoying spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg is involved in volunteer work at her church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and also with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .

BY FAITH

Fifty DollarsBy faith Abraham, when called to go to a place he would later receive as his inheritance, obeyed and went, even though he did not know where he was going. Hebrews 11:8

 

As a counselor in the two-year college system in my home state of Minnesota, I encountered many students who were down on their luck. I kept a $50 bill of my own money in my desk and loaned it to countless students during my time in that position. I told each one of the students who used the loan that they were on their honor to return the money to me when they were able. No one broke the agreement for nearly a decades. And then one day, the $50 was gone. For good. I do not remember who did not return the money to me; it didn’t matter. Circumstances prevented that person from keeping a promise to me. I just hope that the person did some good for someone else along her or his path in life. I had put faith in more students than I ever thought would keep the “loan” going, and everyone—but the last one—had kept the promise.

 

Hebrews 11 recounts many people God asked to trust him, to obey him “by faith.” The chapter is like the “Cliff Notes” of Old Testament saints who did God’s bidding because they had confidence in His everlasting goodness. From Abel to Enoch to Noah to Abraham and Sarah, “all of these people were still living by faith when they died.” (v. 13). How great a faith must it have taken for them to persevere and continue on God’s path even though they would never see the final results of His plan! We must believe that God has a purpose for each of us, no matter how small and insignificant our daily contribution may seem.

 

Each of the students who borrowed that $50 bill did not let the next student in need down. Each returned that money, in essence passing the loan on to someone else. Disappointing as it may have seemed that one final student did not pay the loan back, the faith of the others was passed on countless times. Can we trust daily that God will reward our obedience to Him?

 

Lord, inspire us as You did the saints of old, to trust and obey You daily! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. To date, she has written nearly 700 different devotions, filling one book of daily readings, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she had hoped would be completed by now. She posts once a week, which means in seven years, she will have enough entries to fill a second book. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing, so Meg is pacing herself, enjoying spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg is involved in volunteer work at her church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and also with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .

GREAT LEADERS BUILD BRIDGES

Christ Bridge to GodFor it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— not by works, so that no one can boast. Ephesians 23:8-9

 

When I accepted Christ as my personal savior, I was twenty-nine years old. I had not attended church regularly in my life; I knew nothing about the Bible and what it meant. But my sister had once given me a King James version of God’s Word, and I discovered that I could suddenly read and understand the text somewhat. Knowing I needed much more understanding, I enrolled in a weeks-long course called the Bethel Series, which used graphic illustrations to help those in the class remember what various Scripture passages meant. The one I remember the most clearly to this day is the illustration of the cross of Christ bridging the gap between humankind (me) and sin (also me), leading to reunion and reconciliation with God.

 

I soon began to understand that (a) by my very nature as a human being, I am a sinner, falling short of God’s glory, and (b) I didn’t need to do anything because Christ’s death on the cross had already bridged the gap between me and God. His cross stood for Grace, the unearned, unmerited forgiveness of my faults, shortcomings, stupid behavior, and all the rest that I thought was a permanent stain on my life. Gone. Just like that. And after several decades of following Christ, I am still gob smacked that, in spite of my continued “humanness,” the Lord’s mercies are new every morning.

 

Over the years, I have realized how inexplicably intertwined my career path of social work and counseling have been with my faith walk. I have always been an empath, showing heartfelt compassion and caring for those I met in my life. But being a practicing Christian deepened the meaning behind that concern for others and filled in the cracks with renewed purpose. And in all my work years, I could clearly see that effective leaders—including myself—build bridges to connect people. How else, I asked myself often, would we ever get “unstuck” without the bridges? It had worked for me in a simple introductory religion class, and it works for all of us.

 

Jesus, strengthen us to follow Your example and create bridges to wholeness for others. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. To date, she has written nearly 700 different devotions, filling one book of daily readings, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she had hoped would be completed by now. She posts once a week, which means in seven years, she will have enough entries to fill a second book. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing, so Meg is pacing herself, enjoying spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg is involved in volunteer work at her church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and also with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .

OPTIMIST AT THE APOCALYPSE

Optimist at the Apocalypse“Do you see all these great buildings?” replied Jesus. “Not one stone here will be left on another; every one will be thrown down….” Peter, James, John and Andrew asked Him privately, “Tell us, when will these things happen? And what will be the sign that they are about to be fulfilled?” Mark 13:2-4

 

I recently read an article describing a prominent female political figure as “an optimist at the Apocalypse.” I did not agree with that assessment, and no, I won’t name the political figure or the writer! But I began to think what that would mean to stand watching this world spin out of control and out of existence and be optimistic about that event. Webster defines “optimist” as “a person who is inclined to be hopeful and to expect good outcomes.” And the Apocalypse is described as “the expectation of an imminent cosmic cataclysm in which God destroys the ruling powers of evil and raises the righteous to life in a messianic kingdom.” So observing this “cosmic cataclysm” with mirth and glee might not be everyone’s picture of the “end times.” Hollywood has made many people very rich producing disaster movies that bring viewers to the edges of their theater seats if not their sanity. It is downright scary to consider being a witness to the earth’s demise!

 

The Gospel of Mark recounts Jesus telling the disciples a bit about what the end times will be like. He speaks of false prophets, deception, “wars and rumors of wars,” earthquakes, and famines (Mark 13:6-8). But still the timing of the end will not be clear to us. Many cling to the promise that “the gospel must first be preached to all nations” (v. 10) before the end will come. But we are not to concern ourselves with what we must say if asked to tell why we believe in God’s merciful love, kindness and justice. Jesus says, “Just say whatever is given you at the time, for it is not you speaking, but the Holy Spirit” (v. 14).

 

Why is it whenever the disciples—like us—are freaking out about life, Christ just raising His holy hand and says, “Fear not?” Well, if there ever was an “optimist at the Apocalypse,” friends and neighbors, that would be Jesus Himself.

 

Lord, You say “Fear not.” Teach us to trust You today and always. Amen

 

Alone on a Colorado mountain, Meg Corrigan faced the unthinkable, a situation that almost ended her life. Learn the details of her astounding rescue from the hands of a gun-wielding attacker and how she walked off that mountain. Hers is a story of tragedy turned holy, a journey of sorrow and healing, a powerful message of hope in the darkest hour. In her memoir, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, Meg credits her resilience to the grace of God. She is also the author of Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist, tales based on her years as a drummer in a Hawaiian show band; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, released this month. Meg is a retired college counselor, author, speaker, trainer and sexual assault survivor. She speaks to churches, civic groups, college students, mental health professionals and law enforcement personnel, as well as youth in juvenile facilities. She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota with her husband, Patrick. She loves to coax seemingly dead plants out of the soil in her yard. The couple have four daughters, ten grandchildren and a great-grandchild on the way. Contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net or www.MegCorrigan.com .

CRUISE CONTROL

Cruise Control“Who touched me?” Jesus asked. When they all denied it, Peter said, “Master, the people are crowding and pressing against you.” Luke 8:45

 

There was a frozen fog the morning I picked Agnes up at the farm. Her only child, Edgar, stood peering at me from the barn. I went in the house and helped Agnes pack her one small suitcase, but I didn’t see Edgar sneak in behind me. We turned to leave, his mother hugged him. He looked straight at me and said, “Take care of her.” “I will,’ I said. After forty-six years of marriage, Agnes, a sixty-five year-old farm wife of an alcoholic and violently abusive man, was going to a women’s shelter seventy miles away. The public health nurse had told me the family were “backward.” Edgar did two years in the Army but came right home to help his mother. Seventy milk cows and thirty stanchions meant lots of bellering in the cow yard. His father Alfred could not be counted on. The corn stood unharvested. I didn’t know which was greener: the young county social worker picking Agnes up or the withering stocks in the field.

 

Oddly, we passed Alfred on the gravel road as he was returning to the farm, driving the tractor because he had lost his license for driving drunk. Agnes didn’t even duck, and Alfred wouldn’t know my vehicle anyway. I hit the highway and set the cruise. Agnes stared wide-eyed. “The car drives herself?” she asked. “How can thaThe shelter staff saw Agnes to her tiny room and explained the daily schedule. We all feared she would not fit in with the younger women and their small children at the shelter. But Agnes surprised us. She became the “house mother” to all those new moms; their children flocked to their new “grandma.” Agnes had been courageous to leave her abusive husband. She had turned off the “cruise control” of her daily life of sorrow and found a place where she was useful and cared for. Just as the woman who touched the robe of Christ found there was hope for healing and new life, Agnes found a way to begin again.

 

Lord of Justice, the hands of those suffering domestic violence are reaching out for help. Show them ways to break the chains that bind them and lead then to better lives. Amen

 

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. If you or someone you know suffers at the hands of an abuser, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-7997233. Is this abuse? Follow this link: https://www.thehotline.org/is-this-abuse/

ALL GROWN UP

Children CareersSpeaking the truth in love, we must grow up in every way into Him who is the head, into Christ. Ephesians 4:15

 

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up? I alternated between cowgirl, ballet dancer, and rock star before I was six years old. Then I discovered art, and that’s all I wanted to do, all the time. I did study art, but eventually settled on counseling, and I was pleased with the career I had chosen. When I became a parent, I had lofty dreams for my two daughters. Mostly, like just about every parent, I wanted them to find their way to become mature, independent, healthy adults. A satisfying work life would be a bonus. As most parents would do, I tried my best to instill in my children the ideals and values that I thought would serve them best, even as I was painfully aware that I had been a latecomer to some of those values. I prayed constantly that my own chaotic childhood would not be the legacy I would leave with my daughters.

 

It’s odd that human beings are deemed “mature” when they are able to leave their parents’ homes and create lives of their own. But maturity in Christ is different. In Chapter 4 of his letter to the church in Ephesus, Paul reminded the people of the gifts God gave to each of them: “…some would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers…” (Ephesians 4:11). The point of everyone embracing and using individual gifts was to reach “…maturity, to the measure of the full stature of Christ” (v. 13). This growth, or maturing, should take us into Christ, being ever more dependent on Him, and leaning not on our own understanding (Proverbs 3:5). As we leave our parents’ watchful guidance, we are advised to turn instead to the wisdom of the Lord Who regards us as one of His beloved children. In adulthood, it is He Who equips us to lead balanced, blessed and healthy lives. Staying on God’s path is a daily—sometimes hourly or minute-by-minute—application of the principles at the forefront of my mind. I know when I have deviated because I can feel the chill of walking without my Lord.

 

Jesus, more of You and less of me. Grow me up in You! Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan is the author of three books: Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child; Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian. She holds a Master’s Degree in Counseling from the University of New Mexico and has over thirty years’ experience working with survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, war veterans, and other trauma survivors.  Her books may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

NAMASTE IN BED

“You shall therefore lay up these words of Mine in your heart and in your soul, and you shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be as frontlets between your eyes.” Deuteronomy 11:18

My massage therapist Mary also teaches “Soma Yoga,” which is “slow, gentle exercises that re-educate the nervous system and allow the release of tight, restricted muscles, thereby promoting healing” (yogapedia.com). During the pandemic lockdown, Mary recorded herself giving several soma yoga lessons and provided them to her clients online for free. On one video, I saw her performing both standing moves and some lying on a mat. Since I can no longer get down on the floor and back up again without a forklift involved, I needed to adapt the exercises. Thus, I turned off my computer and ate several chocolate chip cookies. The next time I talked to Mary, she said, “Lie down on your bed with your laptop and do the session there.” But her recorded voice was so soothing that I ended up taking a ninety-minute nap. By now I was beginning to doubt my commitment to soma yoga, as well as my efforts to stop gaining weight during the lockdown. I could easily blame it all on the pandemic, along with my inability to balance my checkbook, my failure to write consistently in spite of a looming literary deadline,  and my desire to binge watch Star Trek reruns with my Treckie husband.

One thing I did not let slide during the lockdown was the maintenance of my spiritual “fitness.” I continued to read my daily devotions, recording my reflections on how the Scripture passages impacted my life. I collected ideas for these devotions which I later compiled into usable 400-word iterations. And I participated in our church’s prayer chain, praying for congregation members, the community, our nation and the world at large. There was and continues to be much to pray for. Moses recounted to the Israelites Yahweh’s orders for them to wear His Word as a sign on their hands and between their eyes (Deuteronomy 11:18). “Phylacteries” were small vessels containing Scripture, forerunners of spiritual practices we keep today. Keeping “fit” in the Spirit helps me live for Christ, and I might just try that soma yoga soon too!

Lord, we thank You for Your Word which keeps us spiritually fit. Amen

CONSPIRACY THEORIES

Conspiracy TheoriesHis divine power has given us everything needed for life and godliness, through the knowledge of Him Who called us by His own glory and goodness. 2 Peter 1:3

 

The Denver International Airport is a hub for the lizard people who run the government and much of the world. The gateway to hell is either under the Denver International Airport or along the French/Swiss border. The earth is hollow and there might be a whole other civilization of advanced beings living there. Osama bin Laden once worked for the CIA. These are a few of the more spectacular “conspiracy theories” I found posted on the internet. “Conspiracy theories” twist facts and are based on the idea that things aren’t as they seem. They are not based on flimsy or contested evidence; they are based on no evidence. A theory about a conspiracy is not the same: the final report on the 9/11 attacks showed much evidence that terrorists planned and carried out the attacks. A conspiracy theory might say, without proof, that the FBI and the CIA actually orchestrated those attacks.

 

In an article on newstatesman.com, conspiracy theories are reported to be “first and foremost forms of political propaganda…designed to denigrate specific individuals or groups or advance a political agenda.” Just because a person or many people believe a conspiracy theory does not mean the theory is true. The article goes on to say these theories are dangerous because they “promote a political agenda…by marketing seductive explanations of major events that are unlikely to be true but are likely to influence public opinion in a preferred direction.” With the advent of the internet, these unproven theories are shared and grown with alarming speed.

 

Those of us who believe that the Bible is God’s Living Word also believe the Good Book is full of truth. That is not to say the books, chapters, and verses cannot be interpreted many ways, and can in fact be used to try to “prove” many false narratives and devious agendas. But for those who seek to follow Christ and know the will of God, the Bible is still the best source we have for learning how to live a sensible and productive life. 2 Peter 1:3 states it clearly: God’s power has given us everything needed for life and godliness.”

 

God of Truth, guide us in all that is right and good. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan is the author of three books: Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child; Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist; and Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian. She holds a Master’s Degree in Counseling from the University of New Mexico and has over thirty years’ experience working with survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, war veterans, and other trauma survivors.  Her books may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

BETTER…NOT NORMAL

Coronavirus Visits

Guest Writer: Donna Mathiowetz

We know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him and are called for His purpose. Romans 8:28

 

When Covid – 19 hit it was as if a switch was turned off and almost everything changed overnight. Non-essential businesses were closed and students finished their current school year by way of “distance learning.” Many adults were now working from home. Restaurants were struggling to keep their establishments afloat by way of curbside service. The city playgrounds in many communities were surrounded by bright orange construction fencing. The implications go on and on.

 

For me, I was grieving for all those who are no longer receiving the personal support they need after the death of a loved one. There are no groups meeting as churches and all community gathering venues are closed. If you didn’t know what Zoom was before, almost everyone, including me, became very familiar with the newest way to gather. Some, but not all of the speaking engagements that were on my calendar after March 15 converted to Zoom meetings. Yes, I could see the faces and hear their voices, but it wasn’t the same for any of us. I missed the personal connections and the ability to hold their hand and give them a hug. Outside of our homes, the best we could do was to remain six feet apart, wearing a mask. Funerals were restricted to no more than ten people present, six feet apart. If their loved ones were residents of a care facility, the family wasn’t allowed to visit, except through a pane of glass. Many who had become ill enough to need hospitalization were also alone, with no visitors allowed in. The long-term implications of the collective repressed grief will be with us for years to come.

I am trying to follow my own advice for self-care. Taking long, brisk walks and riding my bike became my way of relieving the stress that I felt. I spent time each morning reading my devotions and Bible. I journaled and stayed in touch by phone with friends who were supportive and loving. This was a world-wide event, and I only sense what it has done to my little corner of this big blue planet. The fear was almost palpable as I encountered others at the grocery store and around town. The masks covered their nose and mouth, but not their eyes. The eyes often display fatigue, worry and anger, along with fear. People seemed hesitant to look at each other, much less speak a word of encouragement or hope. Kindness seems to be waning, replaced by judgment for some who choose not to wear a mask in public. However, through it all I remember my life verse.

We know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him and are called for His purpose. Romans 8:28

I’d like to encourage you to think about those you know who have been on their own journey of grief during these challenging times. Isolation is always a factor when you’re suffering from a loss and the pandemic has magnified this even more. Even though we saw the term “services pending”, we know that grief doesn’t. So, please make it a point to reach out that someone you know who may really need a listening ear with the understanding that their grief has been delayed but it didn’t just dissipate.

 

So, like almost everyone else, we grieve what seems to have been lost in

all this and wonder what it will mean in the future.

Let’s not go back to normal, but to better.

 

Donna Mathiowetz is an inspirational speaker and author of “A Journal for Your Journey”. Her passion is to help others as they navigate the losses in life resulting from the death of a loved one, health issues, and loss of independence, broken dreams, and other life events.  She helps others to build their resiliency muscles, giving them the ability to bend but not break in the storms of life.  Donna shares her own story of loss, teaches from what she has learned and seeks to inspire others to do more than survive, but instead thrive and look for ways to help others along the way. Donna is a wife, mom and grandmother. She lives in Hastings MN Email: donna@UnfinishedByDesign.com

Website: www.UnfinishedByDesign.com

FB, IG, LinkedIn @ Unfinished by Design

FROM SEA TO SHINING PARKING LOT

Citizenship drivethroughMay the nations be glad and sing for joy, for You rule the peoples with equity and guide the nations of the earth. Psalm 67:4

 

The Corona virus pandemic has changed just about everything in the United States, including how people are sworn in as citizens of our nation. Steve Hartman reported on CBS this weekend that “Immigrants who’ve completed all the requirements of citizenship are pulling into parking lots from San Diego, to Des Moines, to Detroit for socially distant naturalization ceremonies.” Drive-thru citizenship ceremonies? Well, in this time of social distancing and health experts’ recommendations not to hold large gatherings to keep from spreading the virus, being sworn in as a new citizen while sitting in your car has been the next best option. One such immigrant, Kwame Asante is from Ghana and came to the U.S. forty years ago. “Just to be an American is like close to paradise,” he told Hartman. “It’s given me so many opportunities.” Asante is a respiratory therapist, one of the “essential workers” smack in the middle of the pandemic. “He says he’s not scared,” Hartman reported, “now that he’s a proud American. ‘Even if I die today,’ Asante says, ‘I’m OK.’”

 

As a counselor in Minnesota’s state college system for three decades, I was honored to assist students from several dozen nations. They came on student visas, as war refugees, or directly through the immigration process, but most had one common goal: to start a new life in a nation filled with opportunity. I have heard their stories of coming from countries rife with hardship, loss, tragedy, and complete disregard for their human rights. Many endured years in refugee camps with deplorable conditions. What must it have been like to step off an airplane or a ship and take their first look at this proud land which has practiced “the great experiment” called Democracy for nearly two and a half centuries? I was humbled to be at their service during their time at the colleges where I worked.

 

This Fourth of July, I am reminded that, unless we are one hundred percent Native American, we are all immigrants. Remember Jesus said “love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:31), calling this “the second greatest commandment” after loving our Lord.

 

Healing Lord, let us continue to be a nation welcoming immigrants and making them part of “us”. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan finds ideas for her devotional blogs in everyday places and events, from comic strips to magazines and books, comments on the fly from people she meets, ancient memories of her childhood, and nigglings from God. Meg has written a Christian devotional blog for several years that has been read in over 40 countries by 9000 people. A compilation of blogs, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, was published in 2015. Meg is working on a second book (Saints TWO) which she has hopes of completing by Christmas, 2020. Her first book, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, is a memoir about her childhood with an alcoholic mother and a co-dependent father. The book also chronicles Meg’s astounding rescue from the hands of a gun-wielding rapist, a tragedy turned holy, a powerful message of hope in her darkest hour. Meg is a retired college counselor and former social worker. Meg enjoys spending time with her husband, their four daughters and spouses, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as their rescue dog, Bassett/Beagle mix Ginger. Meg and her husband Patrick play and sing in the contemporary worship band at their church, Christ Lutheran in Lake Elmo, Minnesota. She also volunteers with sexual violence/sex trafficking prevention and education. She speaks to groups whenever she if offered the opportunity. She is a voracious reader of other people’s writing, which gives her lots of ideas for more devotional blogs. Read more about her at www.MegCorrigan.com or contact her at MegCorrigan@comcast.net .