WHY THE LOCAL WELL WAS THE FACEBOOK OF BIBLICAL VILLAGES

WellGuest Writer, Stephanie Landsem

 

As I like to say, women of today and women of biblical times have more in common that we might realize. Community, for instance. We might stay in touch with our friends and family in a different way, but we do it for the same reasons. Consider the local village well and Facebook. They don’t seem to have much in common until we look a little more carefully.

Water — as always — was of vital importance in the Bible as it is today. It was just harder to get than turning on a tap. Women needed water in ancient Israel not only for drinking, irrigation, washing, and cooking, but also for religious ritual. Because of its importance, water was a common spiritual metaphor. From the great flood, to the parting of the Red Sea, to Jesus walking on the Sea of Galilee—water had huge significance.

It comes as no surprise, then, that the well was the most important place in the ancient village. We see plenty of important happenings at village wells in both the Old Testament and the New:

Isaac’s wife, Rebekah, was found at a well.

Moses and Zipporah met at a well, as did Jacob and Rachel.

Jesus stopped at a well in Samaria and proclaimed himself the Messiah to a lone woman.

The well was the center of a village’s social and economic life. Early every morning, before the heat of the day, women would go to the well to fetch water in heavy clay jars, sometimes carrying it long distances back to their homes.

Using just a little imagination, we can surmise that friends used the well to check in with each other before starting their day of work —much as many of us do with our social media sites today. Maybe they even made a plan to go at the same time so they could have something to look forward to each morning before they started their many chores. Surely, they were eager to tell friends any good news they had—who was betrothed, who with child. They asked for prayers for aging parents or sick children. They mourned with each other or rejoiced.

Kind of like we do with social media. We check in with our friends, share news, discuss family and politics. Just like Facebook, there was no doubt some vice at the well—gossip, snubbing, some not-so-subtle bragging.  Probably some unfriending happened on the long walk home after the water was drawn. We can be certain that information was passed along from house to house until the whole village had had a chance to like, comment, or share each bit of news.

Next time you check in with friends online– be it first thing in the morning, on our lunch hour, or late at night–take a moment to remember these women of the Bible that were not so very different from us.

Stephanie Landsem writes novels that bring the unknown women of the Bible to life. The Living Water series—The WellThe Thief, and The Tomb, a Novel of Martha—are biblically authentic stories of women who are transformed by encounters with Jesus, the Incarnation. She lives in Minnesota with her husband, occasional adult children, two cats, a dog, and a tortoise named Moe. When she’s not writing, she’s gardening, cooking, and dreaming of travel to far-off places. You can find out more about Stephanie and her books at StephanieLandsem.com.

Stephanie Landsem

The Well (Howard Books/Simon&Schuster)

The Thief (Howard Books, 2014)

The Tomb, A Novel of Martha (Howard Books, April 2015)

sblandsem@comcast.net

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POST TRAUMATIC GROWTH

Light in the DarknessBut for you who revere My name, the Sun of Righteousness will rise with healing in His wings. And you will go free, leaping with joy like calves let out to pasture. Malachi 4:2

 

Army Surgeon Rhonda Cornum’s helicopter was shot down in Iraq in 1991 during Operation Desert Storm. Her injuries were many but not life-threatening. She was captured by Iraqi soldiers, a situation which checked all the boxes for post-traumatic stress: a mock-execution, near death experience, sexual assault, helplessness in the face of the enemy. But Cornum refused to succumb to the terror by immediately beginning to focus on how she could improve her life when she survived. Cornum says resilience is like a muscle: it strengthens when exercised and atrophies when neglected. She was released by her captors within a week and eventually directed the U.S. Army’s Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Program. Today, every Army soldier goes through resilience training; psychologists believe the training can help individuals in all walks of life to survive and thrive following any type of trauma.

 

Two researchers, Richard Tedeschi and Lawrence Calhoun, coined the phrase “post-traumatic growth.” After working with survivors of cancer, severe injury, war, and other traumas, the men identified growth in five main areas: personal strength, relationships, life perspective, appreciation of circumstances (thankfulness), and spirituality. As a survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint with a clear threat that I might not live, I concur with Tedeschi and Calhoun: I became a stronger person because I had seen myself at my most vulnerable. For me, God’s gracious love and healing meant a brand new start for me. I did not “deserve” to be assaulted nor to be threatened with imminent death; the perpetrator was a monster by all accounts. But when I survived, I had a clear choice: to succumb to the fear and panic rising in my mind, or to move forward with my life and heal. I chose God’s healing.

 

I have talked to many whose trauma has left them in a precarious place, but I believe there is much hope in studies like the one on “post-traumatic growth.” Skilled therapists using these sensible techniques can guide trauma survivors into optimism, hope, and resilience to help them live productive and meaningful lives.

 

God of Grace and Healing, touch the broken places in survivors of trauma and lead them to trust in Your loving goodness. Amen

 

Both candid and humorous, insightful and ponderous, Meg Blaine Corrigan’s memoir, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, takes the reader through her chaotic childhood with an alcoholic mother and enabling father to a violent assault that nearly ended her life. She populates her tale with vivid descriptions of her parents, other influential adults, the attacker, and her disastrous first marriage. But this story has a happy ending, when Meg finds solace in a God she didn’t think she’d ever believe in, when He gently helps her heal from her past lives and move into the best times of her life. Meg has also written a novel, Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist, about said first marriage, as well as a Christian devotional, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, comprised of blogs from this site. Stay tuned for sequels to her last two books! All of her works may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

STARS SINGING

milky-way-todd-lake-basin-OR-Jason-Brownlee-8-16-2014-e1420930349249Some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, order your disciples to stop (praising God).” He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the stones would shout out.” Luke 19:39-40

 

Stars are made of hot helium and hydrogen. They shine when by burning hydrogen into helium at their cores. The website earthsky.org explains that, when helium—almost twice as dense as hydrogen—flows rapidly into hydrogen within the star, a pulsation occurs, creating a sound wave. But the sound made is six million times higher than a person could hear, even much higher than sound detected by bats and dolphins. So one might ask, “If a star ‘sings’ in the universe but we can’t hear it, is it still singing?” God would likely say “Yes!”

 

There are many references in the Bible’s poetic language about nature “singing” and praising God in ways that might make skeptics wonder if inanimate objects can really participate in worship. God told His servant Job that “the morning stars sang together” when He created the earth (Job 38:7). He further instructed Job to “ask the beasts..,birds..,fish…,and bushes” how they “perceive” God’s mighty power. Psalm 19:1 says, “The heavens are telling the glory of God; and the firmament proclaims his handiwork.” Isaiah 43:20 reminds us that “the wild animals honor (God) Who provides water in the wilderness and streams in the wasteland.” One of my favorite Scripture quotes is Matthew 6:28-30, in which Jesus tells how the lilies of the field and the birds of the air trust God to care for them.

 

If God is Lord of all the earth, creator of every living thing and all the elements of the earth, how can we not believe that all creation loves Him and praises Him? When Jesus said “the stones would shout out” if the people praising Him were silent, He surely knew it could happen. What an exciting world we live in, when everything is capable of expressing love to our God! How could we be silent when everything around us is already providing a sweet symphony of song for our Maker?

 

Father God, stir us to hear what You hear as we walk throughout all of Your astounding creation! Amen

 

Today’s photo posted to EarthSky Facebook by Jason Brownlee

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

JUSTICE

JusticeHe will not break a bruised reed or quench a smoldering wick until he brings justice to victory. Matthew 12:20

 

Jeffrey Epstein is dead. This week the billionaire American financier, indicted on numerous charges for running an international child sex trafficking ring, was found dead in his jail cell by apparent suicide. His victims thought this was their last best hope of obtaining justice for his kidnapping, rape, and “sale” of possibly hundreds of underaged girls.  Now, his co-conspirators (some female) and other men named in the court proceedings are shouting for joy, believing Epstein’s death will give them a pass from a similar fate to his. His victims may try to bring civil charges, but it won’t be quite the same without the monster in the courtroom, facing his victims.

 

What is to be said of justice that never comes? Of peace of mind that is ripped from the survivors’ hands and hearts? Of a real sense of closure lost to the winds of fate? Our indwelling sense of right and wrong says offenders should be punished and victims protected. Deuteronomy 3:4 says The Rock, His work is perfect, for all His ways are justice. A God of faithfulness and without iniquity, just and upright is He. His justice is compared to a plumb line, ever straight, never faltering (Isaiah 28:17).

 

There is no perversion of justice with the Lord our God (2 Chronicles 19:7). But human actions are never as “straight” and pure as God’s plumb line. Somewhere, in this broken world, survivors of trauma induced at the hands of others must come to grips with the fact that justice is not always assured, peace is not always promised. We are left to figure out what justice might look like, in the absence of perfect law, perfect courts, perfect circumstances. As a survivor of sexual violence never brought to justice, I have learned a hard lesson, but a good one: sometimes justice is just knowing that God believes us, feels our pain, collects our tears in a bottle, and tells us, “Keep going, My child, you are precious in My sight and for that reason alone, you must keep going.”

 

God of Justice, hold close to You those who never see justice in this world. Help them know Your justice prevails in the end. Amen

WALKING WITH GOD

Walking With God Kathi HolmesGuest Blogger, Kathi Holmes

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; Or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the LORD has done this?” Job 12: 7-9

 

Collapsing to the floor, I tried to stand but my legs would not move. The paramedics transported me to the nearest hospital. Pain medication made me groggy, befuddled and frightened. I was told my spine was damaged due to heavy doses of prednisone and the start of osteoporosis. Due to my health history it was too risky to operate. I was told I would be paralyzed from the waist down for the rest of my life. All I asked of God was that He give me the strength to go on in whatever direction He had for me. “Thy will be done.”

 

God didn’t send a lightning bolt that hit me and I suddenly walked. I worked very hard with land and pool therapy, sweat dripping with every movement. I was amazed each time I made a positive step forward.

 

Then God blessed me with my first grandchild. I could wheel her around in my power chair, but as she grew I needed to stand long enough to change her diaper and pick her up from the floor. She was my inspiration to work as hard as I could to improve.

 

Three years later I was walking with a walker. That’s when my husband and I decided to take the leap and get a dog. Charlie was in a wheelchair because of an amputated leg due to a diabetic infection. I would be the sole dog walker. Our rescue dog, Honey, got me walking. Together we stroll down the neighborhood sidewalks and wooded paths. At first we didn’t go far as I got tired quickly, but as the months passed I got stronger and our walks became longer. Honey is not just our companion dog. She is my motivation to walk every day so as not to lose what I worked so hard to gain.

 

I have also developed a friendship with my fellow dog parents. When I walk Honey I smile and say “good morning” to everyone I meet. Occasionally a person looks angry or unhappy, but most often I can get at least a small grin. Rarely does someone not return the “good morning”.

 

Every day the Holy Spirit directs us, sometimes in unusual ways, to be the best God wants us to be.

 

“I can do everything through Him who strengthens me.”  Philippians 4:13

 

Dear Lord, open my ears to hear your words so I may follow your direction as you guide me through my days, knowing you will lead me on the path of goodness and grace. Amen

 

 

Kathryn Holmes is an author and inspirational speaker. Her books include: I Stand with Courage: One Woman’s Journey to Conquer Paralysis; Reflections; Watershed Moments. Contact her at k.m.holmes@comcast.net

 

THE BIBLE IN A BOX

Bible In A BoxBut when Jesus saw this, He was indignant and said to them, “Let the little children come to Me; do not stop them; for it is to such as these that the kingdom of God belongs.” Mark 10:14

 

Our super-creative pastor and youth director embarked on a project last year that had them scrambling every Sunday morning. A simple, empty cardboard shoe box was given to a different child to take home each Sunday for several weeks. The instructions were simple: each child was to place something in the box that was meaningful to him or her and bring the box back to church the following Sunday. One non-negotiable rule: the “something” could not be alive or formerly alive! Each Sunday during the children’s sermon, the pastor and the youth director took turns opening the box and preaching a short sermon on what was inside. When a boy brought in his favorite action character, the message was about how Jesus is always “in action” in our lives, watching over us and directing us on safe and sensible paths (Psalm 119:105). A girl’s collection of leaves and twigs brought a lesson in how God wants us to care for all the living things on our beautiful planet (Genesis 1:26,28). Twin brothers each placed very different items in the box the same week: a photo of their grandpa who had just passed away, and some crayons. These items brought to mind that their grandpa was now in heaven which is even more beautiful and colorful than our home here on earth (John 14:1-4).

 

Adults often don’t give children credit for the things they understand. We hold kids to a specific curriculum for religious education, from Sunday school through confirmation and beyond. We might do better to simply present a passage of Scripture and then listen as they tell us what it means to them. We might be pleasantly surprised what we would hear. Over the years, the vast majority of our confirmands have expressed a firm grasp on what it means to be a Christian. I am always encouraged to realize that we will have a new generation of believers to carry God’s sacred Word to the world when we are gone.

 

Lord, watch over our youth and help them in their faith struggles. They are the bright and shining future of our church. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

 

NO MORE SNATCHING

My sheep hear my voice. I know them, and they follow Me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish. No one will snatch them out of My hand. John 10:27-28

 

Members of the temple leadership asked Jesus if He was really the Messiah. “Jesus answered, ‘The works that I do in My Father’s name testify to Me; but you do not believe, because you do not belong to My sheep.’” The leaders couldn’t understand what He was saying because they did not “belong” to Him. They were “Messiah deniers,” in today’s vernacular. They had seen the miracles Jesus had performed, and they had heard his crystal-clear interpretations of ancient Scripture, but they would not humble themselves to believe that Jesus was the Christ, Who had been foretold in the very Scriptures He now quoted with magnificent authority.

 

As a survivor of a brutal sexual assault at gunpoint—an incident which nearly cost me my life—I am shaken to the core when I hear or read about “sexual violence deniers.” A legislator stated that a woman’s body “shuts down during a true rape,” preventing pregnancy. Arguments have abounded about women “asking for it,” and “men who can’t help themselves.” A talk show host recently opined that women have abortions so they are free to party on a tropical island. My own home state of Minnesota took until 2015 to pass a law that correctly labels sex trafficked minors as victims, not perpetrators. Survivors of sexual violence can tell you that (a) she/he did not ask for it, (b) was not a willing participant, and (c) lives with the trauma from the horrible experience for the rest of her/his life. Women who become pregnant as a result of sexual violence pay double, triple, many times over, regardless of the outcome of that pregnancy.

 

Sexual violence is a global problem which is not going away unless and until “deniers” start hearing the voices of the living survivors as we speak for ourselves and for those of us who did not get to come home. Jesus says those who know Him will not be “snatched” from His loving embrace. His sheep “know” His voice, the voice of peace and love and compassion. All we can ask is for deniers to just listen.

 

Lord, we know we live in a broken and hurting world. We ask that Your voice will be heard throughout the globe, and that we will end sexual violence of all types soon. Amen

 

Meg Blaine Corrigan tells stories of wisdom, strength, fear, joy and risk-taking. Daughter of a raging alcoholic mother, and survivor of sexual assault at gunpoint, Corrigan has shaken a dismal past and flung herself into the arms of Christ, Who sustains her in her daily walk of grace. She shares with her listeners her incredible story of surviving and thriving through many trials during her seven decades walking this fragile earth. She has been described as a Renaissance Woman, integrating her formal training in psychology and counseling, an enlightening experience as a percussionist for a Polynesian show troupe, and most recently as an inspirational author and blogger. Her exposure to many life experiences has enriched her passion for spreading Christ’s word and helping other trauma survivors. She has a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and thirty-plus years of experience in the field of counseling and social work.  She lives in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, with the love of her life, Patrick, and their formerly disenfranchised rescue dog Ginger. www.MegCorrigan.com    MegCorrigan@comcast.net

HUMANITARIAN. CHRIST. US.

Kids In CagesBlessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Matthew 5:3

 

Here’s the thing: I feel totally helpless. I watch the news night after night, and some days there is coverage of the unconscionable treatment of migrant children at the southern border of the United States. But most often now, other news cycles dominate the airwaves and we’re “moving on.” I can’t get those images out of my head. As surely as there is a God in heaven, can we agree that this isn’t right? Whether you belong to the Republican or Democratic party, the Coffee party, or the Friday night party, can we just agree: this needs fixing now? Could any person in his right mind take his own child or grandchild—the younger the better—and place her in a cage with a Mylar blanket for a bed on a cement floor, with only the absolute barest of necessities, with perhaps well-meaning but overworked and way understaffed adults to take care of her, to hear the visiting pediatricians’ and child psychologists’ warnings about the enduring emotional and psychological damage these conditions are doing to this child—and not be on his knees with sorrow and compassion in five minutes? Would any person who is not a complete sociopathic lunatic think that this is the way to deal with the global migrant crisis?  Does the color of a person’s skin really make the cut for why these children—and their parents, for that matter—should have to endure these conditions for even one minute? I believe the vast majority know the answer to that question. In our heart of hearts, we know.

 

Then why aren’t all of us totally outraged? Why aren’t we listening? Why aren’t we contacting our people in Washington? Why aren’t we doing more than “sending thots and prayers?” Jesus said, “Go.” He didn’t say watch the news, and say, “Ain’t it awful?” He said, “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:19). The word “therefore” refers back to all that Christ taught. “Teach all nations” means there are NO EXCLUSIONS to those we are called to serve. That includes each child and adult, no matter the nation or color or creed. So go. Go.

 

Healer of All Nations, we implore You to light the path for this nation to work together to solve this migrant crisis now. Amen

 

To locate your Congressional Representatives and Senators in any state in the USA, use this link: https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members

 

Special Note: The Lord woke me up at 4:30 a.m. this morning to write this blog. He’s been telling me to do it for weeks—maybe months—and He finally got my attention by putting Matthew 28:19 on a loop tape in my brain, 24/7, for a couple of weeks. It didn’t “click” until this morning. Lesson learned: I need to stop and listen to what God is telling me!

 

CHRIST IN THE SHOWER

Bathroom with ShowerAnd Jesus increased in wisdom and in years, and in divine and human favor. Luke 2:52

 

I get frustrated with the “auto fill” feature on my electronic devices. I can’t seem to get a sensible message entered before the little Auto Fill Gremlins try to have their way with my thoughts. More than once, I have meant to record an idea that comes to mind when I read our Lutheran daily devotional publication, “Christ In The Home.” But when I type “Christ In The…,” the next word suggested is “shower.” The image instantly comes to mind of our Lord and Savior soaping up, singing the Psalms at the top of His lungs, while his loyal disciples pour jugs of water over Him. NO! I say, this is NOT what I had in mind at all!

 

Yesterday, my granddaughter Jenna posted on Facebook, “It was a nice day. I took the kids for a walk in the park to the PANIC GAZEBO.” I responded, “Panic Gazebo?!? They have those now? You go there when you are feeling like you’re losing control with my great-grandchildren?” “Grandma,” she replied, “I meant to write ‘picnic gazebo’ but auto-fill jumped in!” “Oh, I see,” I wrote back. “Glad to know it wasn’t a mental health crisis!” I read about a new police officer who texted his mother that he had just received his new “unicorn,” right before he read his first “banana” rights to an arrested person. And “talk to text” creates even more problems, like the woman working from home who sent this message to her boss: “Project complete no no get down bad kitty!”

 

Aren’t you glad “auto correct” wasn’t invented when the Bible was written and translated into many languages? We could have all sorts of issues come up, like “power from on high” becoming “PowerPoint.” Or “spread the gospel” becoming “sprint the goslings.” Or even today’s Scripture: “He increased in wisdom and in years” becoming “incredulous in Wisconsin and yeast.” Well, that’s what the computer wanted me to type! But the good folks who compiled the Bible, filled with the “Holding Spice”—I mean Holy Spirit, took care to make the Living Word a permanent Book of “Instagrams”—I mean Instructions that we could always count on.

 

Father, we thank You that we can count on Your Word to provide us with wisdom and guidance. Amen

 

Both candid and humorous, insightful and ponderous, Meg Blaine Corrigan’s memoir, Then I Am Strong: Moving From My Mother’s Daughter to God’s Child, takes the reader through her chaotic childhood with an alcoholic mother and enabling father to a violent assault that nearly ended her life. She populates her tale with vivid descriptions of her parents, other influential adults, the attacker, and her disastrous first marriage. But this story has a happy ending, when Meg finds solace in a God she didn’t think she’d ever believe in, when He gently helps her heal from her past lives and move into the best times of her life. Meg has also written a novel, Perils of a Polynesian Percussionist, about said first marriage, as well as a Christian devotional, Saints With Slingshots: Daily Devotions for the Slightly Tarnished But Perpetually Forgiven Christian, comprised of blogs from this site. Stay tuned for sequels to her last two books! All of her works may be purchased through her website, www.MegCorrigan.com or from www.amazon.com .

ASK AND YOU WILL RECEIVE

Woman Praying

Guest Blogger, Janet Favorite

If there is anything you need pray for it, asking God for it with thanksgiving; and the peace of God, which is much greater than understanding, will guard both your thoughts and your heart. Philippians 4:6-7

 

Many of us think of prayer as petitioning God for favors, desperately asking for something we need. Often our prayers are not answered in our time frame, that is immediately, and we lose faith.

I pray every day, but not in the typical on your knees posture we see in the movies portraying people brought to the lowest point in their life. I pray simply, for families and towns I see on the news that have been devastated by floods or tornados, family and friends experiencing hard times, compulsions with food, and people in prison.

These are not elaborate prayers. Usually they are one sentence. God help whoever is struggling. Bring them comfort. Are they answered? In my opinion yes. I believe in sending positive energy into the universe. I have seen first hand how people respond to a smile and encouraging words. My husband feels I am a magnet for troubled people. “You were away from me for five minutes. How were you able to connect, hear a heart heavy story, and offer comfort, in such a short time?”

God’s spirit dwells in all of us I feel. We can be the answer to someone’s prayer. A friend told me of how she was just that. A Colorado Christmas holiday including children and grandchildren was planned.  Their condo was decorated with all of her special touches. She mentioned to a nail technician at the end of her stay, a dilemma. She was unable to transport the decorations home. “Would you like them?” The woman began to weep. “I was divorced this year and lost everything. My children and I would be over joyed to accept your gift.”  The ability to help another face to face was something special to her.

Many of us are not willing to humble ourselves and ask for help. Realizing we can’t do it alone is a hard concept for some.  Why are we afraid to ask? God’s help can be secret, vulnerability can be viewed as a sign of weakness.

Keeping our hearts open to give and receive can enrich your life. It can bring you peace and understanding of the ebb and flow of the universe. We were not designed to live in solitude.

Dear God, please “choose me,” even when I don’t think I am able. Help me to be a friend to others and a recipient of friendship. Amen

 

Janet Favorite is the author of Raising Robert. She writes of the emotional impact of raising a son with Prader-Willi Syndrome. The syndrome mimics food addiction along with some challenging behaviors and health issues. Janet feels her early struggles with addiction prepared her for a challenge. You can find her Blog at JanetFavorite.com